Peeple

App review by
Patricia Montic..., Common Sense Media
Peeple App Poster Image
Yelp for people? Not safe for kids.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Ease of Play

It's pretty easy to link your Facebook account to Peeple, but it's not always clear which on-screen button does what. 

Violence

None built in, but it really depends what people write in their reviews.

Sex

Depends on users' posts. Also, unless you're listed as "In a relationship" on Facebook, the app sets your relationship status to "single" by default, letting users rate you romantically. This can be easily turned off in the settings, though.

Language

Depends on users' posts.

Consumerism

Depends on users' posts.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Depends on users' posts.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Peeple is a social-networking app that lets people rate each other in three categories: Professional, Personal, and Dating. The app's privacy policy and terms of service raise serious concerns, as do the developer's plans for monetizing (not yet operative at time of review): Though reviews of people not using the app aren't public, subscribers will be able to see that content, which means ratings of anyone -- using the app or not -- will be accessible. It's listed on the App Store as appropriate for age 17 and up, though the terms of service say users need to be 21. This app is not appropriate for kids or teens.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 15 years old Written byEsperance September 28, 2018

It's just like any other social media (but more honest)

It is no worse than instagram, facebook, twitter, etc. It's just more honest about it. All social media will rate your kids- be it their personality, their... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written bya_dry September 28, 2018

Good Idea But...

it's a good idea but i understand it has ethical issues so if they get rid of the romantic side of it and possibly the personal side of it then they are on... Continue reading

What's it about?

PEEPLE is a social-networking app that lets users rate people professionally, personally, and romantically. To create your account, either create a new user account or sync your Facebook account, and then choose three words to describe yourself (such as "lawyer, soccer, knitting"). Once other users write reviews, your profile includes them, the three words you chose, and an overall rating. To find other users, you can sync your Facebook account, sync contacts from your device, or search your local area for other users with the app. Users have the option to review and delete reviews about themselves, and those not using the app can't be rated publicly -- yet. The developer's plan is to charge people to see all content written about people, even if they're not using the app. If a user deactivates his account, it goes dormant but isn't really deleted: The information is no longer public, and user activity and recommendations go live again if the user reactivates his account.

Is it any good?

In the news even before it launched, this people-rater drew controversy right from the start and with good reason. Unfortunately, it's not a joke, and this app -- whose tagline is "character is destiny" -- has serious potential for enabling unkind behavior. Though its website claims that it's meant to be a positive space, it's also meant as a recruitment tool and for "asset protection," which implies that you can use the app to steer clear of people with low ratings. Because those three-word profiles are too slim to be meaningful, the bulk of your profile comes from what other people say about you. Currently, no one can see posts about those not using the app or reviews you reject, but there are plans to launch a Truth License, which will reveal all reviews -- including unpublished ones -- to paying customers. In terms of how easy it is to use, the interface isn't especially intuitive: It's hard to tell whether you're searching your own contacts or searching all users. Privacy is also a concern, as the terms of service and privacy policy currently apply only to users in Canada, not the United States (it includes the language "you will always be subject to Canadian law"); you have to to opt in to delete your data when you deactivate your account; and your current location is tracked (unless you turn it off in your device settings). Because it's listed as being appropriate for users 21 and up, it's definitely not good for kids, and grown-ups might well steer clear, too.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about your family's rules for social media. What's OK to share? How can you protect yourself online, and how should you act online? Talk about what it means to be a good digital citizen.

  • Though users might post positive reviews, this app has scary potential as a cyberbullying tool. How can you prevent cyberbullying, and what can you do if your child is bullied online? Even though these are tough conversations, talk about how to navigate unkind words online. 

App details

For kids who love safe chatting and social networking

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