Rider

App review by
Paul Semel, Common Sense Media
Rider App Poster Image
Simple but challenging physics-based arcade game.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 6+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Ease of Play

Game uses simple touch controls but isn't easy to master.

Violence & Scariness

While cycle can crash and explode, no blood or gore shown.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Frequent pop-up advertisements, as well as a banner ad along bottom of screen. Also an option to buy ad-free version of game. Players can spend real-world money, watch ads to earn in-game currency, which is then used to buy new bikes.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Rider is a physics-based arcade game that's safe for all ages. By touching your device's screen, you both accelerate your motorcycle over the jump-filled terrain and, when it's airborne, spin it counter-clockwise in hopes of landing it back on its wheels. Failure to do so results in your bike exploding, though there's no blood or gore or even a little driver cursing up a storm. While there's no inappropriate content in the game, it's a bit ad happy. Unless you pay for the ad-free version, you'll see frequent pop-up ads as well as a banner ad along the bottom of the screen. Players can also watch ads or spend real money to buy gems, which are then used to buy new bikes. Also, there's no privacy policy either in the game or on the developer's website, so buyer beware.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

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Kid, 11 years old August 6, 2018

its fun but challenging

its really fun but the levels get so hard

What's it about?

There's no story to RIDER. Instead, you have to ride a Tron-looking motorcycle over a jump-filled course as far as you can -- the kicker being that holding your finger on your tablet or phone's screen not only sends your bike forward but, when it's in mid-air, also rotates the bike counter-clockwise. The hope is that you'll spin it far enough around so that it lands on its wheels, not on its roof or edges, since the latter will cause it to explode, ending your turn. It's a lot trickier than it sounds, but that's what makes this physics-based arcade game so fun.

Is it any good?

While this physics-based arcade game may seem simple, it actually has a lot of variety and challenge where it counts. In Rider, you have to drive a motorcycle as far as you can on a course full of jumps. The kicker to this is that pressing your finger down on your phone or tablet's screen doesn't just make your bike go, it also makes it spin counter-clockwise when you take a jump. Just make sure you land upright, otherwise your motorcycle will explode, ending your turn. While this may sound simple enough, what keeps it challenging is that the tracks get progressively more complex, requiring you to do things that would be impossible in real life, such as driving up the inside of a loop-the-loop. There are also gems you can grab, spinning saw blades to avoid, and other hazards that may require you to give your bike a bit more juice. Which is why Rider serves as a cautionary tale of what not to do on a motorcycle, but also a fun way to spend time when you're not riding your bike.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about money management. Does it bother you that this game has so many ads? Do you think they did that so you'd pay for the ad-free version?

  • Discuss physics. What does Rider teach us about physics or about the physical world?

  • Talk about motorcycle safety. Given how often you crash and burn in this game, do you now understand why people should always wear helmets when riding motorcycles?

App details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love racing

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