Silent Streets The Mocking Bird's Last Dive

App review by
Paul Semel, Common Sense Media
Silent Streets The Mocking Bird's Last Dive App Poster Image
Engaging interactive murder mystery in Victorian England.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Ease of Play

Simple touch controls. Most mini-games rather easy. 

Violence

Game is about a murder. No blood, gore, violence shown, but dead body is described in detail.

Sex

A reference in dialogue to a character's "rump."

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A character is said to have been drinking.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Silent Streets: The Mockingbird's Last Dive is an interactive murder mystery that's not appropriate for younger children. Aside from being a bit scary, it also has some graphic descriptions of dead bodies. There are also minor bits of alcohol use (a character is said to have been drinking) and sexuality (the word "rump" comes up in the dialogue). Read the app's privacy policy on the game's website to find out about the information collected and shared.

User Reviews

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What's it about?

SILENT STREETS: THE MOCKINGBIRD'S LAST DIVE is a Sherlock Holmes-esque murder mystery set in England in the year 1866. After being hired by a somewhat disillusioned wife to find her missing husband, you have to explore the city and sift through clues to find out where he's gone and why he's missing. To do this, you have to interact with various characters, making choices in the dialogue to learn what you need to know, examining clues, and doing a lot of walking. So much walking.

Is it any good?

While this interactive murder mystery is engaging, it's sometimes slightly undermined by flawed technical mechanics. In Silent Streets: The Mockingbird's Last Dive, you have to investigate the disappearance of a woman's husband in 1866. To do so, you have to choose what to say and how to say it, examine certain scenes for clues, and ask a lot of questions. But while this makes for an engaging mystery in the vein of Sherlock Holmes and Agatha Christie, this doesn't always work right if you play it on your iPad instead of your iPhone. For instance, when you want your character to walk somewhere, you can take a cab (which often requires you to play a simple mini-game), you can wait (which often takes a long time), or you can walk in real life. The problem being that your iPad doesn't do a good job of registering your steps, while waiting can take a while, and neither is all that fun. But if you're okay with the slow pace, and you're okay playing a text-heavy game on the small screen of your iPhone, you'll have a lot to think about as you try to solve Silent Streets: The Mockingbird's Last Dive.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about asking questions. You'll do better in Silent Streets if you ask more questions. Do you think this could help you in real life?

  • Talk about euphemisms. In Silent Streets, instead of using the word "ass," they say "rump." Is it generally better to use these kinds of euphemisms rather than curse words?

  • Discuss murder mysteries. This game often feels like a Sherlock Holmes novel or an Agatha Christie book -- do you think it'll get you interested in reading these stories?

App details

For kids who love mystery

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