South Park: Phone Destroyer

App review by
Chris Morris, Common Sense Media
South Park: Phone Destroyer App Poster Image
Raunchy, funny, well-made card game, but not for kids.

Parents say

age 5+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Ease of Play

Simple controls, easy to learn; players eased into harder game elements.

Violence

Lots of blood, shooting, electric bolts, other forms of violence shown, although in cartoon fashion. Designed to show suffering to children.

Sex

Adult men dress as women, other minor sexual references. Characters make sexual remarks as insults to each other. Crude drawing of a penis made using ASCII characters. 

Language

Every form of profanity, including "f--k," "s--t," "bitch," and detailed sexual expressions used in dialogue.

Consumerism

The further you get into the game, the more tempting/necessary it is to buy in-game content. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Some drinking references.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that South Park: Phone Destroyer is a card-based strategy game set in the South Park universe. As one would expect from a game set there, it's brimming with inappropriate content. Language is as foul as a Quentin Tarantino film -- and violence is copious. Racial stereotypes are played up, and hardcore sexual expressions are dropped regularly. There's also an in-app purchase option that becomes more tempting to players as the game progresses. While fun and funny, it's entirely inappropriate for children and even some mature teens. Find out what the publisher does with your personal information by reading its privacy policy

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 2, 8, and 9 year old Written byBob J. December 27, 2017

Good game

Very good game, but depends on your child. If they are good at games, they can play this game. If they have anger issues, do NOT let them play this game, they w... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byGnarly June 25, 2018

Good game, however filled with cheaters and money-grabbing events.

The age rating by csm here i'd say is pretty high. This game is no way an 18+ game, honestly it's pretty tame. Violence is cartoony and it's defi... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byLivyFGLL January 8, 2018

Fun game, not as bad as the show, still not very kid friendly

It's a card game. Blood is sometimes shown, and there is lots of bad language. Honestly, if you don't want your kids (or you) to be exposed to that,... Continue reading

What's it about?

In SOUTH PARK: PHONE DESTROYER, players lead the charge in a South Park-themed game of Cowboys and Indians, where familiar characters are dressed up, each with lots of offensive and defensive capabilities. As the New Kid, a wizard with his smartphone who can summon characters to battle, you'll fight against the AI or battle against other live players (though there's no chat between players -- just gameplay). The game is deep enough that it can be played by newcomers to card strategy games or be challenging to veterans (each level can be played multiple times, with the difficulty increasing each time you play it again after you've won). Campaign stages are classic card-based strategy (you'll choose which of your cards to play, bringing those characters to life to combat what the enemy has chosen), but they're fused with aspects of a side-scrolling game. So, rather than staying in one spot, your band of cowboys will stroll down a street, defeating minor foes before facing the level's boss. Win the battle, and you'll get a chance to draw three more cards for the next fight.

Is it any good?

Like the show it's based on, you probably already have a good idea of whether you'll like this game or not. South Park is a divisive program. Even some older fans may not find it as funny anymore. But if you like the show, you'll love South Park: Phone Destroyer. The trademark sense of humor is just as raunchy and offensive as you'd expect. And the story is largely a threadbare one that's meant to support the game's jokes. If that were all that Phone Destroyer had going for it, it'd be a bust. But the card strategy gameplay itself is also very well done. It's essentially like other strategy deck building games: Players use cards representing characters from the show, each with their own abilities to defeat opponents. As time goes on, you collect more cards and upgrade abilities to become more powerful. The single-player campaign is fun to play and not too frustrating -- and players who prefer player vs. player (PvP) can battle it out as long as they'd like. There's a bit of a heavy lean on in-app purchases, especially as you progress later in the game, but that's quickly becoming the norm for titles. Ultimately, this is a well-crafted game loaded with humor. The question players need to ask is: Is it the kind of humor that appeals to them personally?

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about anger management -- and why it's important. Can you see how the ways these kids express their emotions could get them in serious trouble? Why are their actions not OK?

  • Talk about the value of a vivid imagination. Do you know why you don't need electronics to have a good time?

App details

  • Devices: iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android
  • Price: Free
  • Pricing structure: Free
  • Release date: November 14, 2017
  • Category: Card Games
  • Topics: Adventures
  • Size: 81.70 MB
  • Publisher: Ubisoft
  • Version: 2.1.0
  • Minimum software requirements: Requires iOS 9.0 or later; Requires Android 4.4 and up

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love strategy

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