Spot It: A Card Game to Challenge Your Friends

App review by
Paul Semel, Common Sense Media
Spot It: A Card Game to Challenge Your Friends App Poster Image
Competitive matching game loses interest, fun very quickly.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Ease of Play

Simple controls, easy to learn.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language

Screen names are monitored, preventing profanity.

Consumerism

Players can buy currency to purchase helpful assistants, or upgrades for said assistants, or to keep playing. Players can also earn in-game currency by watching ads.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Spot It: A Card Game to Challenge Your Friends is a simple matching game, and as such, doesn't have any objectionable content. In fact, if you try to use a naughty word as your screen name, you'll be prevented. Players can use real-world money to buy in-game gold, which is used to buy a helpful assistant or upgrade the assistant's abilities, or to continue playing when you run out of turns. Players can also double the amount of gold earned by watching advertisements for other games. Read the app's privacy policy in the game's settings menu or on the game's website to find out about the information collected and shared.

User Reviews

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What's it about?

As an arcade-esque matching game where you're racing against the clock to match objects on-screen, SPOT IT: A CARD GAME TO CHALLENGE YOUR FRIENDS doesn't have a story. You simply play round after round against opponents so that you can keep going with your match discovery. Players can also use AI assistants to help them with matches if they need a hand.

Is it any good?

Though it puts a different spin on matching games, this game shows that "different" doesn't always mean "interesting" or "engaging." In the game of Spot It, you have a circle with a bunch of icons in it: a cat, a key, and so on. If one of them is the same as one that's in the main circle, simple tap it to match them, earning points. Just don't spend too much time thinking about it, since you're racing against the clock, and your opponent, to earn the most points. Along the way, you'll get help from such characters as Hattori, who changes unwanted symbols into ones you actually need. The thing is, while you're matching these symbols, so is your opponent. Also, if they match an icon that's both in the main circle and your circle, they take yours as well. Thankfully, though, you can do this as well, therefore earning even more points. The problem is that there's very little challenge to this game, but a lot of redundancy: once you've played a couple of rounds, you feel like you've played them all. Sure, your assistants do different things, but none change the game in any significant way -- certainly not enough that you'd want to play this very long, and that's only if you have nothing else to do. Which is why Spot It is ultimately as engaging as matching socks after you've done a bunch of laundry.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about pattern recognition. The point of this game is to match the symbols as quickly as possible, but how can this skill be helpful? How about when you're driving and see a road sign?

  • Talk about good sportsmanship. Why is it important to be a good loser? And a good winner?

  • Discuss money management. Given that you can earn the in-game money by playing, or just waiting, is there really any reason to spend money on this mediocre game?

App details

For kids who love board games

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