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States of Matter by Tinybop

App review by
Ana Beltran, Common Sense Media
States of Matter by Tinybop App Poster Image
Explore the states of matter to solidify science knowledge.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational Value

Kids can learn about solids, liquids, and gases and can experiment to see how temperature changes impact different types of matter. They will also be able to see molecules behave depending on the state of matter and how they move at different temperatures. Content specific vocabulary adds to the educational experience for kids who can read or are enjoying the app with a reading buddy. 

Ease of Play

There are no verbal, written, or visual instructions. The app is designed to promote open-ended play. Kids can tap and swipe to explore the app’s features and decide how they want to play. Time spent exploring, leads to better understanding of how to take full advantage of the app.   

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
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Consumerism

A link on the launch page takes kids to a collection of apps by the developer. These apps can be downloaded directly. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that States of Matter by Tinybop is an interactive educational app that allows little ones to explore and learn about solids, liquids, and gases. It is number eleven in Tinybop’s Explorer’s Library, which is a series of apps dedicated to offering science learning platforms. Kids can experiment with things such as ice, soda, popcorn, helium, and gold and watch how temperature changes affect states of matter. Although there are no direct instructions or verbal lessons, kids can turn on the label feature to display content specific vocabulary. They can also determine the language of the labels by selecting their preference from a list of thirty plus languages. Read the developer's privacy policy for details on how your (or your kids') information is collected, used, and shared and any choices you may have in the matter, and note that privacy policies and terms of service frequently change.

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What's it about?

STATES OF MATTER BY TINYBOP lets kids explore and learn about different states of matter through open-ended play. There's no tutorial or direct instructions on how to navigate the app. Instead, it encourages kids to tap and swipe to discover its features, explore its content, and decide how they want to engage with the app. Choose a container, tap one of the three spouts representing the three states of matter, and watch it fill with things like purple soda, bromine, or gold nuggets. Kids will learn about the three states of matter and will explore their shape, how molecules behave, and how changes in temperature affect molecular movement, leading to changes in state of matter. Move the bar on the thermometer to watch how temperature changes affects the objects in the container. Will it freeze? Will it melt? Will it evaporate? Will it condense? They’ll watch and hear gases liquify and solids melt as they change the temperature on the thermometer. They’ll also be able to see that different objects have different melting and freezing points. The interactive labels are available in over thirty languages, allowing young readers to learn specific scientific vocabulary associated with the concepts in the app. 

Is it any good?

Little scientists will be captivated by the colorful display that illustrates concepts in an engaging way and gets kids excited to explore states of matter even further. States of Matter by Tinybop serves as a platform for investigation and real-life observation and experiments. Watching how different objects react to temperature changes and watching how molecules move differently depending on state of matter will spark conversation, get kids asking questions, and motivate them to make real world connections. The open play design promotes curiosity and allows kids to explore freely, without limitations. Although this design aims to empower kids to take the lead and decide how they want to engage with the app themselves, the lack of direction may be confusing or frustrating for those who prefer a bit more structure. Young readers or kids playing alongside a grownup will be able to take advantage of the labels to learn content specific vocabulary. Since States of Matter by Tinybop doesn’t have a verbal explanation of what is happening on screen and relies heavily on observation to draw conclusions about states of matter, enjoying the app as a family will increase its educational value, giving kids an opportunity to ask questions or simply share their new understanding. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can categorize objects found in their home as solids, liquids, and gases to compliment playing with States of Matter by Tinybop. After deciding on objects’ current state of matter, talk about the characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases. Talk about how molecules move depending on state of matter. If we find a solid, what might its molecules looks like? When looking at liquids, what might their molecules look like? How do the molecules in gases behave?

  • Make connection by exploring how temperature changes impact states of matter. Point out how these changes are happening all around them. What do you notice happening to the water while we make rice? What happens to the ice cubes in your juice? 

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