Toca Kitchen 2

App review by
Mieke VanderBorght, Common Sense Media
Toca Kitchen 2 App Poster Image
Open-ended cooking game lets kids play with their food.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 4+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational Value

Kids can learn about how much fun it is to take charge in the kitchen as they choose ingredients and decide how to cook them. They also can work on their observation and data-collection skills to track guests' reactions to each food to discover each diner's personal preferences. Why does this guest like one food but not another? How can kids make a food so their guests will enjoy it? Add spices? Combine it with another food? The satisfaction they feel from seeing the results of their creative combinations in Toca Kitchen 2 may inspire kids to explore with food and cooking in the real kitchen. 

Ease of Play

Overall, gameplay is easy. Some actions can be a little awkward at first, especially for the youngest players. Sometimes kids must follow a complicated sequence -- tap here, then there, then do that, then drag -- to get food, cook it, and feed it to a character, all of which may prove challenging. But once kids get the hang of it, they should be able to navigate easily.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

There is a small icon on the home screen that leads to ads for other apps by the same developer. Parents can hide this icon through their device's settings menu. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Toca Kitchen 2 is an open-ended, free-exploration game in which kids are in charge in the kitchen. As in the original Toca Kitchen, kids experiment with feeding food to ever-hungry guests and watching their reactions. Kids choose the food and how to prepare it: raw fish, oven-baked pineapple, or mushroom juice -- anything is possible. One thing to note is that the frying-pan tool always fries food in butter, so there is no experimenting with different fats or flavorings. The sequence of taps, drags, and screen changes can be a bit complicated, especially for young kids. Parents may want to help kids through at first before letting them explore on their own. Once kids get going, though, there's no stopping them: Play is unlimited and never ending. A letter from the developer gives some nice hints on how to enhance kids' experience with Toca Kitchen 2 through guided discussion and key questions. Read the developer's privacy policy for details on how your (or your kids') information is collected, used, and shared and any choices you may have in the matter, and note that privacy policies and terms of service frequently change.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 8 years old October 23, 2015

Just amazing

My baby brother is obsessed with cooking and I mean obsessed with cooking. He is two years old and knows how to make cakes and pikelets off by heart. He know mo... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old September 23, 2016

Not just for the little ones

I can imagine how fun it would be to make you're own foods when you are little, but the fun really gets going, when you get older. It sounds dark but its j... Continue reading

What's it about?

When you play TOCA KITCHEN 2, choose one of three guests to feed, then get cooking! Choose one or more ingredients from the 16 foods available in the fridge. Drag the food raw into the guest's mouth or take it to the kitchen where you can cut it, juice it, fry it, bake it, or drop it in boiling water. Add some spice to it, and then feed it to the guest. Guests react to different foods in different ways: They like some, whereas others make them sneeze, and if it's too hot, they'll breathe out steam. Experiment with mixing foods, cooking methods, and pleasing your guests' palates.

Is it any good?

Toca Kitchen 2, as with its predecessor Toca Kitchen, shines as a platform for no-rules, no-right-or-wrong-answer, open-ended play. With the safety of using virtual knives and fire, kids take on the role of chef to cook, combine, and create unique dishes. Navigation among the various screens -- for example, getting a piece of food out of the fridge, into a cooking instrument, and then on the guest's plate -- may prove difficult for the littlest chefs, so be sure to be available for guidance. There are some neat features, such as how food browns as it's cooked or steams when it comes out of the hot oven. However, there's something important missing in this virtual kitchen -- the feel of soft bread or slimy fish -- and that heavenly smell of something yummy baking in the oven just can't be replicated with a 2-D screen. Toca Kitchen 2 is a fun and creative game that can perhaps be an inspiration for enjoying the wonders of creating in a real-world kitchen.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what kids think about the foods and their cooking combinations. Would they like to drink mushroom fish juice? Why, or why not? How does cooking food or adding spices change the flavor?

  • Get kids cooking and exploring in the real kitchen. There are plenty of safe ways for kids to help out: They can mix, pour, and cut soft foods with kid-safe knives, and food they make themselves tastes better.

  • Read the letter from the developer for helpful hints on expanding this creative cooking game into a richer experience.

App details

For kids who love apps for young kids

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