Wild Kratts Creature Power

App review by
Amanda Bindel, Common Sense Media
Wild Kratts Creature Power App Poster Image
Cool facts, easy games best suited for younger Kratts fans.

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational value

Kids can learn about raccoons, bees, and elephants and their interactions with their habitats. They'll practice matching skills as they pollinate flowers, take care of elephants, and feed raccoons. They'll learn vocabulary like omnivore and pollinate, and they'll practice decision-making as they play the mini-games. The app teaches kids hands-on how bees pollinate flowers, how elephants keep cool, clean, and bug free, and the foods that omnivore raccoons eat. Wild Kratts Creature Power does a beautiful job of combining fun with high-interest material and delivering it in a way that kids will remember.

Ease of play

Gestures require a strong and fast fine motor skills.

Violence & scariness
Language
Consumerism

The info section includes a link to more apps. The kid-lock function only requires a two-second tap and hold, which is not going to deter kids in the target age range for the app. The app is a tie-in to the hit PBS Kids program.

Drinking, drugs & smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Wild Kratts Creature Power teaches kids cool facts about bees, raccoons, and elephants in first-player games inspired by the PBS Kids show Wild Kratts. The app's description tags the target player as 6 to 8 years old, but the games are easily mastered and may be more suited to 4- and 5-year-olds. Kids can take their picture using the device's camera and put their own image into a creature power suit, just like the Kratt brothers wear. The photos are saved to the camera roll, but there are no in-app sharing options.

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What's it about?

WILD KRATTS CREATURE POWER puts kids in the creature power suit of a bee, a raccoon, and an elephant. In the Bee Game, kids become bees and fly through blooming flowers, pollinating matching flowers. In the Raccoon Game, they help a mama raccoon collect the right foods -- berries, nuts, worms, frogs, and fish -- to bring to her babies. In the Elephant Game, they help elephants deal with their habitats by using mud for sunscreen, water for baths, and dust for bug repellant. Kids earn stickers and can put their own picture in a creature power suit as rewards.

Is it any good?

Wild Kratts Creature Power makes learning about animals fun by giving kids a hands-on experience. Rather than just telling kids that elephants use mud as sunscreen and dust to repel bugs, kids get to actually put the mud and dust onto the elephants. A short tutorial demonstrates each game before kids play the first time, and it can be replayed if necessary. Putting themselves into a creature power suit is a cool reward that kids unlock after playing a level of each game, but lining their face up in the camera is tricky. The show's target audience is 6 to 8 year olds, but the games won't challenge kids that age for more than a few plays, so this may be better suited to younger Kratts fans.

 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Go on a hike to observe creatures. Identify foods that omnivores like the raccoon would eat.

  • Talk about the importance of bees in the ecosystem. Bee stings may hurt, but we need bees so we have food.

App details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love animals and science

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