Maniac Magee

 
Exciting, moving story explores racism, myth making.
Newbery Medal and Honors

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Sometimes you have to find your own home and create your own family. Judge people by their character, not the color of their skin.

Positive role models

Maniac is resilient and athletic and tries to bridge the racial divide in his adopted town. The Beales, an African-American family, take Maniac in, and a park groundskeeper also cares for him awhile. The McNabs espouse a virulent racism and prepare for a race war. The McNab children steal, swear, cut school, smoke, and drink.

Violence

Several racial standoffs are chilling. A mom slaps Maniac when he trash talks, but then both of them a sorry for the incident, and he hugs her. References to Maniac's parents dying in an accident when he was an infant. A man dies. Maniac loses nearly everyone who matters to him and at one point loses interest in living.

Sex
Not applicable
Language

Some mild bathroom-oriented words. Both anti-white and anti-black slurs. Maniac is called "Fishbelly" and "honky donkey."

Consumerism
Not applicable
Drinking, drugs, & smoking

The McNab children smoke and drink.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Jerry Spinelli's Maniac Magee is an exciting, moving, and sometimes funny story, brilliantly told, about an orphan boy who runs away from his feuding aunt and uncle at age 8 and makes a name (and legend) for himself in a racially divided town. It won the 1991 Newbery Medal and remains a vital, relevant classic. Several racial standoffs are chilling. Some kids smoke and drink. One man dies. And there are references to Maniac's parents dying in an accident when he was an infant.

What's the story?

A homeless orphan becomes a legend in a town divided by racism in this sometimes funny, sometimes moving, always exciting story. Jeffrey Magee's exploits may have made him famous, but reconciling a town filled with hate and finding a decent life for himself may be more than even he can manage.

Is it any good?

QUALITY
 

One of the greatest Newbery winners ever, Jerry Spinelli's MANIAC MAGEE is a riveting story, swinging between joy and sorrow, that works on many levels: as a realistic novel, as the recounting of a legend, and as a no-easy-answers statement on race relations. The ending shows the possibility of some personal happiness for Jeffrey but offers no pat answers to the town's racial problems. There are heroes and monsters on both sides, and Jeffrey is able to find, even in the most hate-filled among them, redeeming qualities and humanity.

But though Jeffrey makes a difference in the lives of many, the reader is forced to realize that the idea that he can somehow bring about a reconciliation between the races is naive. The secondary characters are well drawn and appealing, the story is exciting, and the ideas are thought-provoking. And the book offers little moments that, though understated, are sometimes uplifting, sometimes heartrending, but always involving. This book should not be missed.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about legends. Are there "legendary" stories about your family members or classmates?

  • What do you think about how racism is portrayed in Maniac Magee? Does it seem realistic? How does the book help you understand how a town could be divided along racial lines? How does Maniac Magee compare with other books you've read that deal with race?

  • How much truth is there in the stories told about Maniac Magee? Which do you find more interesting: what really happened, or the embellished tales?

Book details

Author:Jerry Spinelli
Genre:Family Life
Topics:Sports and martial arts, Brothers and sisters, Friendship, Misfits and underdogs
Book type:Fiction
Publisher:Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:January 1, 1990
Number of pages:184
Award:Newbery Medal and Honors

This review of Maniac Magee was written by

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Quality

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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Written byAnonymous February 1, 2014
age 10+
 

Touching story about a young boy

Parents need to know that this Newbery- Award- Winning book contains themes about racism, bullying, death, and more. This book will have you crying and laughing. In a town divided by race, one boy breaks the color barrier by living with many families on the run. After his Parents die because of a drunk driver, (then he briefly lives with his always arguing Aunt and Uncle), He travels to West and East End, where je lives with The Beales, a normal African American Family, Then with Grayson, a old man who practically live at the YMCA and allows Maniac to sleep a t the zoo with the buffaloes and deer, and then he lives with the crazy Mcnab's . Problems ensue, especially race problems, like when A African American calls Maniac ''whitey'' and when a Caucasian asks questions about African Americans like '' do they have the same beds? Same couches? ETC. Inspiring Read, though I do not want to spoil it! Some racist language, topics include Death, Poverty, Bullying, Pride, Religion,Education, and Life. Clean, but maybe to hard to handle for some kids. -MuppetMania
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models
Too much swearing
Kid, 10 years old November 15, 2009
age 10+
 

Grade 5 and up

I like this book. In 5th grade you read it (your teachers have to make the decision whether to let you know about african american discrimination for when you read this book in class). It is very sad at one point, i knew a few people who almost cried at that part.
What other families should know
Educational value
Adult Written bydd2400 April 9, 2008
age 0+
 

worst book ever

worst book ever
Parent of a 10 and 11 year old Written bylitmom123 January 28, 2011
age 9+
 

Perfect book

Could possibly be the closest thing to the perfect child's novel, ever. Jeffrey if forced to run away from the worst kind of unfeeling people this world produces and goes on the search to find a family who will love him for who he is. Jeffrey Magee is naive, loving, kind and completely without the traditional social barriers that we force on our children. His baths with the Beale children are wonderfully innocent and without need of judgement. What he suffers for the sake of the McNab children is what I want my children to see as being a good and decent human being. From his relationship with Mars Bar and the Beales, to his time spent with Greyson, right down to his dedication to the McNab children, I can't think of a better role model than Jeffrey Magee.
What other families should know
Educational value
Great messages
Great role models

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