Mummies in the Morning: Magic Tree House, Book 3

Book review by
Megan McDonald, Common Sense Media
Mummies in the Morning: Magic Tree House, Book 3 Book Poster Image
Exciting time travel to Egypt.

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 9 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Positive Messages

The boy Jack has a much more active role than his younger sister Annie.

Violence & Scariness
Language

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that there's nothing to be concerned about here, and much that's educational. A flying tree house is sure to spark young imaginations, as well as interest in Ancient Egypt. Girl and boy central characters try to do the right thing as they solve the mystery and aid a ghost-queen.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 2 and 5 year old Written byreasonh May 2, 2011

awesome! Read them with your 4/5 year old.....great imagination!

This has interested my 5 year old son to want to read chapter books. It is awesome to hear him talking about what book is next and what book he has already rea... Continue reading
Adult Written byMom 22 May 2, 2012

Too much evil

There is a lot of evil. Things like a ghost queen and the undead. I was excited my son was into this series until I learned more about this, the third book in... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byBookWorm94 April 9, 2008

I liked it...

I liked it...when I was in 3rd grade. Not a bad book, it can teach a young child, but the series starts to get boring once you reach 5th grade, tops. I recommen... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bypattty May 12, 2012

my review

its a great book though! i liked it and i got as an assignment to do a summary for it... so i think iwont be able to do that cause the book's too small and... Continue reading

What's the story?

The treehouse is spinning again, and Jack and Annie are whisked back to Ancient Egypt. Their third easy-to-read, exciting adventure has them decoding hieroglyphs to help usher a ghost-queen mummy into the next life. Complete with black cats and secret codes.

\ Eight-year-old Jack and seven-year-old Annie are set for their third adventure when they find a book on pyramids in the magic treehouse. They soon land in the desert of Ancient Egypt, where they witness an Egyptian funeral procession carrying a sarcophagus on its way to a pyramid.

Then it disappears, and Jack and Annie follow a mysterious black cat to the burial chamber. Spooky shadows and strange cries lead them to a mummy queen, a ghost who needs help finding the Book of the Dead. The two adventurers follow hieroglyphic clues of stairs, boat, jug, and folded cloth to uncover the Book of the Dead and return it to Queen Hutepi.

Is it any good?

Mary Pope Osborne has the magic formula for creating suspense and intrigue without being too scary. The page-turning plot is episodic; each chapter moves quickly from pyramids, mirages, and black cats to tomb robbers, mummies, and false passages.

Jack reads from his book and records notes -- a clever device that gives kids just enough background on unfamiliar facts and terms of ancient Egypt, such as sarcophagi and hieroglyphs, to understand the story line. Not a thread is left untied; just when it seems the mystery is complete, Annie gets lost in a false passage. Suspense builds, as the two do-gooders have to crack codes to complete their mission.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the history of ancient Egypt, and perhaps do some research. Why did Egyptians mummify their dead? Why did they build the giant pyramids?

Book details

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