The Big Field

Book review by
Matt Berman, Common Sense Media
The Big Field Book Poster Image
Action-packed, emotional dad-son baseball story.

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 9 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Positive Messages

Lupica deftly uses Hutch's rivalry with Darryl to lay bare Hutch's troubled relationship with his distant and disappointed father, who has given up on life and wants Hutch to do the same. This is what you hope for when you recommend a sports book to reluctant readers: action that will keep them riveted to the page in a story will help deepen their understanding of the game, of people, and of life.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Hutch works hard a being a good person and team captain, and at doing the right thing.

Violence

A brief scuffle.

Sex
Language
Consumerism

Gatorade, Blockbuster, Dairy Queen, Nike, Dell.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Hutch's dad drinks beer a lot.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that, aside from the mentions of some products, there is nothing to be concerned about here. Hutch, despite some understandable mistakes, is a great role model of conscious sportsmanship and team playing.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byRidley21 September 6, 2009

Perfect for teenagers (12,13,14,15,16,17,18)

My 13 year old son hates to read and out of all of the books he had to read in his life he only liked three books and "The Big Field" is one of those... Continue reading
Adult Written bysb34chick November 21, 2009

Fantastic Read

Mike Lupica does it again. A great story for those readers looking for something a little more challenging than Matt Christopher's famous sports books.
Teen, 17 years old Written bymakinaaaaa May 3, 2011

Some People over 9. Dad is not a good role model.

The big field.... i used for a book report in 8th grade english, let me tell you it was a bore. I finshed it and thought it was someone okay. i love softball an... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old October 1, 2010

perfect

i like this book because it is just good

What's the story?

When shortstop Hutch is moved to second base on his team to make room for more talented, but arrogant, new player Darryl, he rolls with the punches for the good of the team. But when he sees his own father, who never seems to have any time for or interest in him, coaching Darryl, he can't handle it, and endangers both what's left of his relationship with his dad, and his team's chances in the championship.

Is it any good?

Most good sports books are exciting, suspenseful, and action-packed, and this one is too -- the many game and practice scenes are fast-paced and lovingly described. Here's what some of the best baseball books are: lyrical, almost poetic, in their attempt to capture that indefinable feeling that makes baseball different from any other sport. This one is too -- Lupica's sharp and rhythmic prose brilliantly captures the passion, joy, intelligence, and beauty of the summertime sport.

Here's what most of those other books are not: moving, powerfully emotional, as much concerned with the characters as with the sports action. But this one is. There's really only one other writer who can pack this much emotion and sheer intelligence into sports fiction for kids: Bruce Brooks, and he hasn't had a new novel in years. Lupica deftly uses Hutch's rivalry with Darryl to lay bare Hutch's troubled relationship with his distant and disappointed father, who has given up on life and wants Hutch to do the same. This is what you hope for when you recommend a sports book to reluctant readers: action that will keep them riveted to the page in a story will help deepen their understanding of the game, of people, and of life.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Hutch's dad. Why is he the way he is?

  • Why did losing his baseball dream hit him so hard?

  • Why can't he connect with his son? Also, why does Hutch love the game so much?

  • Have you ever felt that way about a sport?

Book details

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