The Kill Order

Book review by
Kate Pavao, Common Sense Media
The Kill Order Book Poster Image
Action-packed prequel to popular Maze Runner trilogy.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 15 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this book.

Educational Value

The Kill Order will appeal to reluctant readers who prefer action-packed books. The story shows the value of cooperation when survival is at stake.

Positive Messages

There's a message here about the importance of family and community, especially during troubled times. There's also a message about the importance of knowing the truth: Mark and Alec fight not only to save their loved ones, but also to discover why their community -- and other communities like theirs -- have been poisoned.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Mark is a loyal character who never forgets about the people he loves or stops fighting for them. He does fight and kill, but always with a greater sense of purpose.

Violence

Lots of battles as Mark tries to survive both sun flares and a deadly virus. The virus kills many people quickly, but others become crazy and violent, swarming together in masses to kill Mark, his friends, and even a little girl who appears to be immune. After successfully defending himself from one attack, Mark admits that he enjoyed killing a man ("For a second, it felt like Christmas morning, watching a guy get crushed to death.") Other people die when they're stabbed, burned, and even shot by futuristic weapons that make them simply disappear.

Sex

Mark and his girlfriend hug, kiss, and spend the night together, but nothing more is ever described. She makes a joke, pretending that they were late returning to camp because they were having sex.

Language

A few uses of words like "damn," "bastard," "crap," "hell," etc.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Brief comparison between the crazy actions of the virus-infected and crank addicts ("Mark had known some druggies in his life, but those were the worst ... it was something you never came back from").

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that violence and danger permeate The Kill Order, the action-packed prequel to the Maze Runner trilogy. There are lots of battles as protagonist Mark fights to survive both sun flares and a deadly virus. The virus kills many people quickly, but others become crazy and violent, swarming together in masses to kill Mark, his friends, and even a little girl who appears to be immune. After successfully defending himself from one attack, Mark admits that he enjoyed killing a man. Other people die when they're stabbed, burned, and even shot by futuristic weapons that make them simply disappear. Mark and his girlfriend hug, kiss, and spend the night together, but nothing more is described. The Kill Order will appeal to reluctant readers and any teens who love adventure.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byVictor Diniz Rozek November 13, 2013

Kill order is age appropriate

Don't judge a book by its cover or title. Let your kids read this it will give them a meaning of how lucky they are not to have diseases are be mentally il...
Adult Written byContreras.ac February 29, 2016

Great book

I think that this book was great because to me it is like an experience of life if there was a zombie apocalypse or the world was ending. In the story it talks... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byDonovan Snider October 26, 2014

A little intense for me.

This book was a bit intense for me, as having read the Maze Runner trilogy first, I wasn't prepared for the level of violence I encountered. If, though, yo... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bySocrates2000 December 18, 2013

The Kill Order

This book is really good. I, as a 13 year old, would say that this book would better suit someone of age 14. The book gave me nightmares for days after. The poi... Continue reading

What's the story?

What if sun flares hit the Earth, killing nearly everyone and leaving a few survivors in a ravaged world? And what if-- just as life begins returning -- a virus outbreak started picking off the remaining population? This is the terrible world that teenage Mark tries to stay alive in, along with a collection of new family members -- including his girlfriend and a little girl who appears to be immune to the virus. He works hard to protect them, even if that means attacking and killing those who try to do them harm. He also struggles to find out more about the soldiers who purposefully spread the deadly virus, which starts mutating to turn its newer victims crazy and violent. This prequel to the Maze Runner trilogy sets up the popular series about kids in a bizarre government experiment but features new characters and can be read as a stand-alone book.

Is it any good?

The action makes the book a fast read and a great choice for reluctant readers, who will flinch along the way at some of the extreme material, like when Mark admits enjoying crushing a man to death. The characters in THE KILL ORDER may be a bit stereotypical  -- Mark's entourage includes Alec, a grizzled old man with a heart of gold, and feisty, popular Trina, who only became Mark's girlfriend after "pretty much everyone else she'd ever known had died" -- but teens will certainly race their way through Mark's endless battles.

Teens may lose sight of some of the bigger issues while they're reading this prequel, but when they finish, they'll be ready to discuss lots of thought-provoking questions, from the speculative (if you were in a life-or-death situation, what would you do to survive?) to the philosophical (is it ever right for a government to decide who gets a share of limited resources or who gets to survive?). Parents and teachers should consider reading along so they can launch these compelling and important conversations.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what would happen if they had to try to survive a catastrophic world event like the sun flares described in The Kill Order. Would cooperation or competition be a better strategy? How would they decide what rules to live by?

  • Why are books like this one, which describe dark future worlds, so popular with teens right now? What about them is resonating with today's YA readers?

  • If you've read the Maze Runner trilogy, how does The Kill Order compare? Is it as good? What do you think about creating a prequel after a series has concluded? Is it a marketing ploy or a welcome addition?

Book details

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