Assassin's Creed II

Game review by
Marc Saltzman, Common Sense Media
Assassin's Creed II Game Poster Image
Violence, sex, and revenge make epic game not for kids.
Parents recommendPopular with kids

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 71 reviews

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 146 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive messages

Needless to say, a game that has you play as an assassin doesn't necessarily send out the best message. Ezio, the main character, however, does see himself as a good person who places family and honor as a high priority, and believes he's rooting out evil and avenging those who have wronged him. 

Positive role models & representations

Ezio isn't a good role model because his profession requires him to kill other human beings.

Ease of play

A bit of a learning curve, but players who have played other action-adventure hybrids should be able to pick up on the mechanics and control pretty easily.

Violence

The main player becomes a skilled assassin in the game, and performs a number of kills on targets. Some are quite graphic, such as stabbing and slicing with twin blades, after sneaking up on unsuspecting victims. Blood gushes out of wounds, and wet slicing sounds add to the realism. Some cut scenes show particularly intense and disturbing deaths, such as one in which a blade penetrates a man's neck and pins him to the ground.

Sex

While there is no nudity in the game, there is some suggestive imagery. Players can undress a woman as a part of a seduction mini-game that shows her bare back side and clothes falling to the floor if you "succeed." Some animated sequences also show women -- sometimes in brothels -- engaged in dialogue that refers to the act of sex. As well, character backstories refer to such things as adultery, sodomy, prostitution, rape, and "page-boy fantasies."

 

Language

The game contains swear words in both English and Italian. This includes "f--k" and "s--t", as well as hell and damn. These words aren't spoken often (as they are in a game like Grand Theft Auto IV) but they're in Assassin's Creed II. Italian profanity includes: "c-zzo" and "m-rda."

Consumerism
Drinking, drugs & smoking

There are scenes with families drinking wine, but nothing excessive.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Assassin's Creed II is very violent and definitely not for children. Players assume the role of a deadly assassin who uses weapons such as knives, swords, and daggers to kill human targets. Deaths -- both those resulting from the player character's actions and those in vivid cut scenes -- are shown in graphic detail. Blood spills from wounds and the action is sometimes slowed down for dramatic effect. While somewhat gratuitious, there is no gore, such as hacking off limbs and such. Parents should also be aware of some sexual imagery and references in dialogue (but no nudity) and some strong language can be heard during dialogue sequences, too.

User Reviews

Parent of a 13 year old Written byRobert J July 16, 2010

Perfect for a Mature Child.

Assassins Creed 2 is a great game for children 13 and up. But that is only if they are mature enough to handle it. Violence: first of all, you can turn off th... Continue reading
Parent of a 8, 14, and 17 year old Written bySpecimenB June 22, 2012

What started as engrossing and fun later became extravagantly offensive.

Very in depth game with amazing life and a historical feel. The missions were challenging and fun. However, the constant and blatant attacks on the Christian ch... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byPahrokkal March 4, 2013

Assassins Creed 2 (Parents this is for you)

Assassins Creed 2. one of the most judged games in the world. Some parents think that this game is overly inappropriate because of the name/M rating. Most paren... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byBauer Power February 25, 2011

Great

Great! You can buy swords, knives, and hammers

What's it about?

If you ever needed proof video game sequels are often better than their predecessor (er, unlike Hollywood), consider ASSASSIN'S CREED II, Ubisoft Montreal's ambitious sequel that had more than 250 developers working on the title for three years. Unlike 2007's Assassin's Creed, where you relive the role of a skilled assassin in the Middle East during the time of the Third Crusade, this new adventure drops you in Italy during the Renaissance. You play as young noble Ezio, whose sense of adventure turns to a thirst for vengeance. Along the way you'll also meet a young Leonardo Da Vinci, a family friend, and test out his wild contraptions including a flying machine that helps Ezio take to the skies.

Is it any good?

Yes, indeed, but as the name of the game suggests, parents need to be aware of the strong violence in Assassin's Creed II, as well as its sexual references and profanity (please read our breakout descriptions above). This epic story is played out over more than 100 missions, many of which are non-linear, and let you take advantage of the open-world -- and meticulously detailed -- environment, such as historically accurate buildings, city streets, and landmarks. With role-playing game-like skill upgrades, tens of thousands of lines of dialogue, and varied objectives to keep things fresh, Assassin's Creed II is well worth the price of admission.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about whether violence in a game like Assassin's Creed II -- against humans -- is worse than games that have you kill zombies (such as the Resident Evil or Left 4 Dead series) or aliens (as in Halo or Gears of War). That is, does it matter who the victims are? Why or why not? 

  • Families can also discuss whether a game that takes place in an historical setting such as the Italian Renaissance helps remove the player from reality (as opposed to games that take place during a contemporary time and familiar place, like Grand Theft Auto IV).

Game details

For kids who love action games

Our editors recommend

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