Brothers in Arms: Road to Hill 30

Game review by
Aaron Lazenby, Common Sense Media
Brothers in Arms: Road to Hill 30 Game Poster Image
Thoughtful, complex, and gritty WWII title.
Parents recommend

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 9 reviews

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 7 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

While war warps morality and encourages killing, the bonds these soldiers develop are a result of trust built in a dire situation.

Violence

Lots of realistic war violence, magnified by the close quarters you share with fellow soldiers who are injured and killed.

Sex
Language

Very strong.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this game spares no battlefield detail. Players will not only hear harsh obscenities, but also see dead soldiers hanging from trees and blood spurting from fresh wounds.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byarmyman April 9, 2008
a good kinda bloody educational game i say any 14 and up kid couldhandle and for all the moms out there it is a great game for any son of yours 14 and up defina... Continue reading
Adult Written bySam Marrick November 19, 2017

Decent, somehwat different WW2 game.

Content similar to Saving Private Ryan. Blood has large puff and stains environments, some weapons can dismember enemies including chunks of heads. However most... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byMyxboxliveisroc... February 10, 2011

Eh not for kids but has some education in it i guess.

Pretty fun and i like it but it has TONS of gore but not as much as the new one but still its fun and all and i would recommend the new one over this unless its... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written bydt10 April 9, 2008

Awsome

this is the best vido game out yet

What's it about?

Based on Stephen Ambrose's best-selling account of a group of paratroopers separated from each other during the invasion of Normandy, BROTHERS IN ARMS: ROAD TO HILL 30 is historical re-creation of eight days in the lives of an embattled company from the 101st Airborne. Players control Sgt. Matt Baker, a reluctant squad leader tasked with clearing the French countryside of entrenched German forces and leading his men to the climactic battle at hill 30. Along the way he must accomplish a series of missions -- blow up a bridge, secure a town from German forces, or capture machine gun encampments.

Baker has the ability to direct as many as two additional teams of men to support him in his endeavors. Without the ability to rush enemies, take damage, and heal, players are forced to use real military tactics such as suppressive fire and flank maneuvers to outwit the enemy.

Is it any good?

The easy-to-use squad controls do not overly complicate gameplay. This is a good thing, because the enemies in this realistic and challenging game are smart, vicious, and fire bullets that do realistic damage. The game features elegant visuals, notable for their restraint. The finer, understated details -- such as marked gravestones or waving grass in a field -- make the game's realism all the more impressive.

Characters use all varieties of obscenities. And while the violence is not gratuitous, it is war, and Brothers in Arms presents a gamut of brutal images -- dead soldiers hanging from trees, blood spurting from fresh wounds, and gory sheets used to cover the dead. The opening cut scene contains some of the worst the game has to offer in the way of language and violence. While the violence is too much for sensitive players, older teens will appreciate the complexity, and the history presented here.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the historical details of this real campaign or read the book (or watch the mini-series adaptation on DVD) to get a complete sense of the story and consequences. Parents may also want to talk about the protagonist's ambivalent feelings; how does this thoughtful portrayal contrast with some of the more gung-ho, one-dimensional depictions and characters?

Game details

Our editors recommend

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