Dragon Ball Z Sagas: Evolution

Game review by
Chris Saunders, Common Sense Media
Dragon Ball Z Sagas: Evolution Game Poster Image
Mildly violent, mediocre action for teens.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 12+
Based on 7 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

The games focus on killing makes it a poor choice for younger players.

Violence

The object of the game is to kill the enemy before being able to advance through the game. There is blood.

Sex
Language
Consumerism

This game is based on an anime series and is part of a number of video games. There is other Dragon Ball Z gear, such as a card game, a chess set, and action figures.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this game features plenty of violence, making it unsuitable for kids under 13. While there is no human bloodshed, characters bleed when punched and kicked; for the most part they simply fall to the ground after you kill them. A background voice constantly reminds players to kill the enemy before moving on to other parts of the game. The game features online gaming options, and parents may want to take precautions.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byT.W. Dalbeck April 9, 2008

Not worth your time (and that goes double if you like Dragonball Z)

A 3D adventure game based off of DBZ could've been a really good idea; not a great one but good. Too bad it isn't really good at all. While the... Continue reading
Kid, 10 years old January 29, 2010
DONT PLAY THIS IM SORRY BUT THIS GAME IS BAD
Teen, 15 years old Written bybabygirl41512 April 9, 2008

What's it about?

In DRAGON BALL Z SAGAS: EVOLUTION, players are transported into the action-filled, animated world of Dragon Ball Z, with chapters of the popular TV series being played out with actual characters. The game follows the early episodes of the series, beginning with the Saiyan Saga and ending with the Cell Games.

Choose from six playable heroes, including Goku, Gohan, and Piccolo. Your objectives: Collect items, defeat enemies, and destroy monster rock formations, all while protecting the game's key characters and advancing through the chapters, all in an effort to save the universe. You can play by yourself in single-player adventure mode, or team up with a friend in double-player mode for cooperative play or arcade-style battles.

Is it any good?

This is geared toward teen fans of the Dragon Ball Z series. Beginning players probably will get frustrated with skills needed to control the hero, while experienced players may not be impressed with the bland design and low-resolution graphics. Camera angles do not change throughout, making for a predictable gaming experience. The complex game controls require the use of all buttons to perform many of the basic functions of the game.

The game is violent -- you can destroy enemies with a flame ball, kick them into rocks or punch and kick them until they are dead. But the violence is cartoonish and enemies are alien-looking creatures that fall to the ground and simply fade away when killed. Parents who believe their teens are mature enough to play this online may want to ensure that their teens play in a public space and encourage them to play with friends. Parents should check in regularly to see who they are playing with.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the Dragon Ball Z franchise of videos, games and products. Since the game uses characters from the TV show, you may ask your kids: How does the game help promote the TV show? How does it promote other merchandise?

Game details

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