God of War: Origins Collection

Game review by
Chad Sapieha, Common Sense Media
God of War: Origins Collection Game Poster Image
Two of the PSP’s most violent games come to PlayStation 3.

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 16+
Based on 5 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Both games sensationalize and glorify bloody fantasy combat. They tell stories in which the lines between good and evil are blurred. The player’s fight is against a corrupt system of heavenly powers, but countless innocents die at the hands of both sides.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Kratos is a perpetually angry anti-hero who is ashamed of his past and seeks to erase terrible memories in which his family dies or suffers at his hands, but never to any avail. While his battle against the gods is not without merit, he has done and continues to do terrible deeds. His existence is defined by violence.

Ease of Play

These games can be just as challenging as those originally developed for PlayStation 3. However, several difficulty settings should allow players of all skills to play at a level that suits them.

Violence

Players spend the vast majority of their time using a pair of chained swords -- plus other melee weapons and occasionally magic -- to slaughter countless enemies, both human and mythical. Blood flies through the air in great gushes, crimson-coated bodies can be found on the ground, and players frequently engage in supremely violent execution mini-games that see them goring some foes, strangling others, and even stabbing some in their faces. Players may also kill innocent civilians attempting to flee the carnage. Grunts and cries of pain often accompany character deaths. 

Sex

Scenes in both games feature nude women with large breasts completely exposed. Players can also engage in an optional mini-game that sees Kratos lie in bed with a pair of naked women. The camera shifts away from the bed, then players follow control cues that cause the women to moan in ecstasy, the controller to vibrate, and the screen to shake -- non-visual indications of a successful sexual act.   

Language

The collection includes a feature-length bonus video that sees the franchise’s five directors chatting about their games. They frequently employ profanity, though offending words have been bleeped out.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that God of War: Origins Collection brings two God of War games (God of War: Ghost of Sparta and God of War: Chain of Olympus) originally released for PlayStation Portable to the PlayStation 3. Though not as graphically sophisticated as their console-based brethren, both entries continue the franchise’s gory tradition of extreme violence and aggression. Players should expect to see plenty of brutal and bloody melee executions. No details have been added to these remastered versions, but displayed on large televisions, the games may appear even more violent than they did on the PSP’s comparatively tiny display. Parents should also note that while the franchise’s hero believes he is involved in a righteous battle, he is in possession of few admirable personality traits. He has and continues to commit carelessly heinous acts that often result in innocent civilian characters being killed.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byCheesewhiz February 27, 2013

Gory fun with good gameplay but not for kids

This is one game (ok it's technically 2 games) you don't want to play around your kid, parents, or girlfriend. Excessive violence and nudity with a se... Continue reading
Adult Written byillusiondk January 26, 2012
Teen, 15 years old Written bybucks2012 September 2, 2012

Easy 11 if no SEX

Violence 4/5 it is all fantasy but extremily bloody/gory Sex 5/5- VERY VERY VERY INAPPROPRIATE!!!!!!!! Nudity in the 2 games. Kind of pointless that they put i... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bycerealkiller189 February 14, 2012

Very bad,no kids.

I wouldn't call it YUCK,but obviously the god of war series is bad.This makes Gears Of War look like hmmm....Mario Kart or something.I have played God of w... Continue reading

What's it about?

With the creation of the GOD OF WAR: ORIGINS COLLECTION, all five games in Sony’s popular and extremely violent fantasy action game franchise are now available to be played on PlayStation 3. This pack combines Chains of Olympus and Ghost of Sparta, a pair of games originally released only for PlayStation Portable that tell prequel stories featuring franchise protagonist Kratos, an angry Spartan who feels as though the gods of Olympus have cheated and betrayed him. Chains of Olympus details his exploits during his service to the gods, while Ghost of Sparta chronicles his quest to redeem himself for having failed his brother when he was a child. Both games deliver bloody combat mixed with the occasional puzzle and epic boss battle. A feature-length bonus video puts the directors of all five games together in the same room to discuss the franchise’s design, meaning, and evolution.

Is it any good?

Both of this collection’s constituent games are considered among the best ever released for PlayStation Portable, and with good reason. Despite the system’s smallish screen and limited controls, they felt much like the games players were used to playing in their living rooms. They featured top-notch writing and voice acting, memorably epic battles, and familiar but original elements in the form of new magic and weapons. It bears mentioning that, like all God of War games, their bloody, gory action is suitable only for adult audiences.

Both games have been remastered for high-definition televisions, but don’t let that fool you into thinking they look as good as God of War III or even either of the first two games made for PlayStation 2. Jagged edges have been smoothed, but no details have been added. Consequently, there’s little reason for those who’ve already played these games on PSP to pay for them again here. However, adult gamers who have long followed Kratos’ tale and don’t own PSPs may well enjoy learning what the bald Spartan was up to in his earlier years.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about violence in games. Can extreme violence ever be morally justified in entertainment? Can it legitimately enhance a story or an interactive experience? Do you see a difference between acts of violence carried out against fantastical creatures and humans?

  • Families can also discuss sexuality in games. How do you think girl gamers feel about the way women are typically depicted in games? How about boy gamers? What sort of female characters would you like to see more of in games?

Game details

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