Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey

Game review by
Harold Goldberg, Common Sense Media
Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey Game Poster Image
M-rated DS game that's definitely not for kids - sci-fi RPG.

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 14+
Based on 5 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

This is a dark game with adult issues. Everything from prostitution to the devastation of global warming is presented in news programs you watch in cut scenes. However, if you and your crew proceed and work together, you will be able to save the world from demons and an ever-expanding hole in Antarctica. Ultimately, the power of optimism wins out.

Positive Role Models & Representations

There are very bad demons in the game and tone of sadness and depression. But they are tempered by the optimism and nose-to-the-grindstone work ethic of your team.That said, this is a game about killing demons.

Ease of Play

While this is a hardcore role-playing game, there are very detailed tutorials presented during gameplay throughout the first hour of play. It's not an easy game to play, but you'll get used to it after that first hour of hand-holding.

Violence

While the game is rated M, it's a light mature when it comes to the violence. You won't see the gushing blood and guts that you see in console games. Rather, you see death in more of a still frame. And the death is not big; instead, it's a small sprite that expires. You will see in the frame pools of rich, red blood. In text, not audio, you read, "Ahhhh" when the character expires. The guns and weapons are used in turn-based fashion. So there's no constant "rat-tat-tat" and rag doll physics that show a body flying when being hit. However, when your character dies, things go black.

Sex

Some of the female demons show their human-like, strangely nipple-less breasts. You'll find that some of the monsters also have heads shaped like penises. The text outlines the fact that some of the evil demons rape men and women while they slumber.

Language

The language is of the medium variety with words like "a--hole" and "s--t" of being used in text, not audio.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey is one of the rare Mature-rated games for the Nintendo DS. This is a dark role-playing game filled with gloom and depression that pervades the Earth, and it's hard not to be affected by that. The game has sex and violence, but it is tempered by the lower-technology of the DS. You don't see animated blood and guts when people die. Instead, you see a frame or two of the character bending over and falling. Then, there's a pool of blood, again, not animated. You'll see characters that look like human sexual organs and there are sexual themes, especially when you read about some of the proclivities of the demons.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 14 years old Written byAussieJo November 17, 2015
You guys worry about language in a teen's game when your kid is swearing their head off whenever you're not in earshot. In somewhere like a school, yo... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bycerealkiller189 March 2, 2012

Great game for sci-fi lovers.

As I love sci fi games and mature rated games,I knew this was a awesome buy and so I got it from GameStop for my DS.It was also a good idea,since there are very... Continue reading

What's it about?

In SHIN MEGAMI TENSEI: STRANGE JOURNEY, you enter a dark futuristic world that's one hundred years in the future. It's a world full of complex issues that are sometimes often depressing, chaotic, violent and sexual. Within 10 minutes, you find that there's something very wrong at the South Pole, something mysterious and evil called a Schwarzwelt. You and a crew are asked to travel to the frozen tundra and enter this the ever-expanding hole. It's a new dimenson where you deal with as many as 300 demons of varying creepiness. If you do things right, you just might save the world. If you don't, you'll die.

Is it any good?

Here's a game that will probably provide you with 100 hours of gameplay. It can be annoyingly slow-moving as you press the 'A' button through thousands of lines of science fiction-based dialog. Yes, there is violence with pools of blood. And yes, some of the demons resemble sexual organs. And, yes, you eventually enter the gates of hell. But much of this is presented in still frames and in text, not with animation and audio. Somehow, that lessens the severity of the mature themes.

As you kill demons and level up, your and your Demonica space suit grow stronger. What's really cool here is that you can communicate with the demons and try to convince them to help you out in your journey. If a demon agrees to your request, you then have all the powers of the demon to help you through the strange world. Also included in the package is a bonus CD with the game's orchestral soundtrack. Despite the slow-moving story, if you stick with Strange Journey, you'll be rewarded with some very innovative gameplay in a science fiction offering that's well worth the price of admission.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families should only talk about this game when the over-17 members of the clan are around. Are any of the demons scary or are they just cool to look at?

  • Do you think there is too much blood when characters die or is it tastefully done?

  • Do you think the hole in the South Pole is a veiled reference to global warming?

  • Do you think the game spends too much time or not enough time on tutorials?

Game details

  • Platforms: Nintendo DS
  • Price: $34.99
  • Available online? Not available online
  • Developer: Atlus
  • Release date: March 23, 2010
  • Genre: Role Playing
  • ESRB rating: M for Blood, Fantasy Violence, Language, Partial Nudity, Sexual Themes

For kids who love games with rich stories

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate