Super Mario All-Stars: 25th Anniversary Collection

Game review by
Chad Sapieha, Common Sense Media
Super Mario All-Stars: 25th Anniversary Collection Game Poster Image
Fun, classic, retro compilation lacks compelling extras.

Parents say

age 3+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 5+
Based on 6 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

The games in this compilation are perhaps the simplest and purest form of interactive entertainment, with little in the way of narrative themes or meaning. Story and dialogue are all but non-existent, and little that occurs in the game can be effectively translated in real-world terms. The only substantial message players might take away is that perseverance and practice pays off.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Mario is a hero on a quest to save a princess held hostage by the evil Bowser. He is a paradigm of good in the world of games, though he does little that players could possibly hope to replicate or emulate, save show bravery.

Ease of Play

These are classic games for several reasons, one of which is that they are intuitive and accessible to players of all skill levels, both genders, and most ages. With the exception of Super Mario Bros: The Lost Levels, which offers up some fiendishly difficult challenges best enjoyed by only the franchise’s most hardcore fans, the games offered here are suitable for a broad audience.

Violence & Scariness

Mario jumps on his enemies’ heads to squish them and shoots them with fireballs to make them fall off of the screen. Should Mario fall victim to a goomba or piranha plant he will leap straight up and fall off the screen.

Language
Consumerism

Mario is perhaps the most recognizable video game character on the planet, and the subject of countless spin-offs and pieces of themed video game paraphernalia. This is a way to bring back older games.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Super Mario All-Stars: 25th Anniversary Edition is a collection of decades-old platformer games, most of which are considered classics within the video game community. The action is innocuous; the worst players will see is purely fantastical characters being squished by one of Mario’s jumps or kicked off the screen. Virtually nothing here can be equated to the real world. Note, though, that some of the challenges -- particularly those in the Lost Levels portion of this compilation -- can prove fearsomely challenging.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written by2happy2na February 14, 2011

Great for kids but, a waste of money.

It's good for kids but, you're paying about 29.99$ for four SNES games. You can play those game on your browser for free. -_-
Parent of a 4 year old Written byGameboyHippo February 22, 2011

Perfect for anyone who gets the concept of gaming

Playing Mario with my daughter builds her confidence and gives us some bonding time that we both enjoy. Even when she was three, she did very well.
Kid, 11 years old May 8, 2011

Lacks anything new

What is nintendo thinking on this one? Hey I know it's been 25 years since the first mario game but you think you're impressing people by making the a... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bysmashwolf88 April 18, 2011

BEST 4 GAMES EVER.

the best games of all time rapped into one if u have not already BUY THIS GAME.

What's it about?

A collection of classic Mario games, SUPER MARIO ALL-STARS: 25TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION contains four complete titles originally developed for the quarter-century-old Nintendo Entertainment System: Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 2, Super Mario Bros. 3, and Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels (A.K.A. Super Mario Bros. 2 in Japan). This compilation was originally release for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1993, and remains more or less unchanged, save the addition of a souvenir booklet containing art from and text about the series and a CD that features some classic sound effects and audio tracks from Mario games released over the last 25 years.

Is it any good?

There’s little not to like about the interactive entertainment on offer in this collection. Two of the most memorable games ever made -- Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 3 -- are just as much fun today as they were back in the mid-1980s, and ought to keep both kids and parents entertained for a long while. Meanwhile, Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels (originally released as Super Mario Bros. 2 in Japan), offers some of the most challenging 2-D platformer gaming of its era and should prove a good test for hardcore Mario fans. Super Mario Bros. 2, the odd-duck out due to its origins (it was originally a non-Mario game in Japan and re-made with Mario personalities for U.S. release), is fun, too.

Our only real beef with the package is that it offers nothing new. These games have not been visually polished for the Wii. Plus, the CD and art booklet are squandered opportunities. The booklet’s recounting of the franchise offers little meaningful insight, and the CD is far from comprehensive. Fans will be disappointed. The games are great, but the overall package is lacking.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the history of video games. How have games evolved since these were released more than two decades ago? Are modern games more fun?

  • Families can also discuss Mario’s continued popularity. Why are Mario games past and present so revered? What makes a Mario game different and potentially special?

  • His iconic status in popular culture has turned Mario-branded paraphernalia into collectible items. Do you actively seek out Mario merchandise? If so, what do you hope to gain from owning it?

Game details

  • Platforms: Nintendo Wii
  • Price: $29.99
  • Available online? Not available online
  • Developer: Nintendo
  • Release date: December 12, 2010
  • Genre: Action/Adventure
  • ESRB rating: E for (No descriptors)

For kids who love Nintendo games

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