The Ship

Game review by
Aaron Lazenby, Common Sense Media
The Ship Game Poster Image
Creative first-person stalker may appeal to teens.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 10+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages
Violence

While no blood is spilled, players dispatch their opponents with all manner of weapons -- including scalpels, axes, machine guns, and poisons, among others.

Sex
Language

Any game with online play has the potential to inspire obscenities from opponents.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this game is predominantly an online experience. Players hunt each other in a multiplayer environment and attempt to murder each other through various brutal, creative means. Parents should also know that the game is currently only available as a download via Valve's Steam service, requiring the installation of the Steam tool on the family's computer. Common Sense Media does not recommend online play for anyone younger than 12.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 15 years old Written byranah April 9, 2008
Teen, 15 years old Written byTangyTigerShark September 9, 2016

An amazing game iffy for 9 and under.

this game is not very violent but it is all about murder like, a lot of murder and things you can murder with like blunt weapons,sharp weapons and a few firearm... Continue reading

What's it about?

THE SHIP players control a genteel passenger aboard one of Mr. X's luxury cruise liners. But this is no vacation on the high seas: Some passengers have been recruited to play a deadly game of hide-and-seek for Mr. X's viewing pleasure. At the beginning of each round, players are assigned someone on the ship to hunt and kill. The goal is to search the ballrooms, hallways, stairwells, and decks and slay your target.

Someone has also been assigned to hunt you, making close contact with other passengers risky. And with personal needs to attend to -- passengers get hungry, need sleep, require a bathroom break, etc. -- players often find themselves in a vulnerable situation. Weapons found throughout the ship -- chef's knives, poison, a Tommy gun, and a samurai sword, to name a few -- are used to dispatch victims. But look out for video cameras, guards, and witnesses -- brandishing a weapon in their presence can incur a hefty fine and require players to spend time in the brig.

Is it any good?

It's really too bad that the game's marred by glitchy gameplay, because the premise holds great promise. The critical roles played by strategy and discretion make The Ship much more interesting than your average FPS. And the game's reliance on online multiplayer action (don't bother with the offline version -- the computer-directed opponents are dumb enough to take a nap in a sauna) increases the unpredictability of the game, as well as a player's need for creative thinking.

While the subject matter is murder, the violence is pretty tame by contemporary standards. No blood is spilled, and combat is clumsy and vague. Like the classic board game Clue, the thrill is in the hunt, not the kill, making The Ship a mannered departure from its mayhem-driven cousins. But glitches like floating opponents, slow frame rate, and crashes all too frequently disrupt the flow of the experience.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the meticulous, focused violence of this game, which is a departure from the mayhem typically associated with first-person shooters. Is quietly stalking a victim more brutal than mowing down countless enemies with a rocket launcher?

Game details

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