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Untitled Goose Game

Game review by
David Chapman, Common Sense Media
Untitled Goose Game Game Poster Image
Don't let your goose get cooked in feathered fun puzzler.

Parents say

age 5+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this game.

Positive Messages

Your sole purpose for being in the game is to annoy the heck out of the villagers, causing chaos, stealing items, etc. This isn't being done for any greater purpose than just being a royal pest.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The goose is both mischievous and malicious in its actions, though it's more about being a nuisance than being a threat. You're a troublemaker, and you're good at what you do.

Ease of Play

Overall, the game is relatively easy to play, without much in the way of penalties for making mistakes. If you don't accomplish your goal the first time, just walk around and come back later. The difficulty comes in trying to plan ahead, setting up sometimes cartoonish chains of events to get to your ultimate goal.

Violence & Scariness

As the goose, you can honk and flap your wings at people, as well as interact with different objects. Any perceived violence is more about getting chased by villagers or causing accidents in a slapstick manner. At most, you might cause people to trip and fall over.

Language
Consumerism

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Untitled Goose Game is an action/puzzle game available for download on Nintendo Switch, as well as Windows and MacOS based computers. Players take control of a mischievous goose as it taunts and terrorizes the citizens of a small village. The game encourages bad behavior, including stealing items from people, causing accidents, and otherwise ruining people's day in any way possible. The game's easy to pick up and play for gamers of all ages and skill levels, challenging players to come up with creative ways to accomplish the goose's objectives. Violence is extremely limited and slapstick in nature.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byShmadge November 6, 2019

Good fun

Really clever puzzles that work well for all ages. Kids love being sneaky goose. The goose behavior is certainly "bad" but in a very playful preten... Continue reading
Adult Written bywizardortitan October 20, 2019

Completely unobjectionable

The only reason I put 5+ is because I'm not sure if anyone younger could get down the controls (or if I'd let them handle my Switch).
Teen, 17 years old Written byTickleMyPickleG... November 4, 2019
Teen, 14 years old Written byLogtioxic October 18, 2019

It’s fine

Would let any small child play if they understood how

What's it about?

UNTITLED GOOSE GAME starts in a quaint little village, a serene place where the people enjoy the peace and tranquility that life has to offer. At least they did, until a certain waterfowl with a bad temper and a bit of a devious streak comes flapping in to ruin everyone's day. And that winged terror is you. As the (un)titular goose in question, your job is to wreak havoc among the villagers, interrupting their work, shattering their piece of mind, and relieving them of their most prized possession. You might be a menace, but you're also a menace with a mission. Think you've got what it takes to fulfill your devilish To-Do list, opening up more of the town showcase your troublemaking talent?

Is it any good?

Admittedly, some days it's just plain fun to be the bad guy. That's something the folks behind Untitled Goose Game understand, giving players a chance to relish in the mayhem of terrorizing a village full of people with little more than a bit of stealth, a bit of cunning, and an excess of honking. What's most surprising about the game is that its beauty lies in its simplicity. The art style won't tax anyone's hardware, as it's a relatively basic presentation that comes across almost like a minimalist painting brought to life. Smooth and fluid animations add an extra level to the game's realism, with characters acting like you would expect actual people to do. These are people just trying to live their lives and go about their daily routines … until you come along to muck it all up.

While it's easy (and fun) to just run around town haphazardly causing chaos and leaving a swath of irritable townsfolk in your path, there truly is a method to the madness. Each day starts you off with a To-Do list of trouble to cause and items to recover. Completing each task requires a bit of forethought and skill, planning ways to catch the humans off guard and then executing that plan to perfection. Sometimes it takes an almost Rube Goldberg set of circumstances to fall into place to get exactly what you need, but those times when it all comes together, you can't help but feel a bit of pride in your villainous machinations.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about playing the "bad guy." How do video game occasionally allow players to act contrary to their normal behavior? What is the appeal of playing a "bad guy" in video games?

  • What are some of the reasons that people should be careful when dealing with wild animals? What are some of the ways that animals respond to humans in the real world?

Game details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love mischief

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