28 Days Later

Movie review by
Nell Minow, Common Sense Media
28 Days Later Movie Poster Image
Viral apocalypse, zombies, and terror. For adults.
  • R
  • 2003
  • 108 minutes
Parents recommendPopular with kids

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 15 reviews

Kids say

age 14+
Based on 35 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Violence

Graphic violence, characters killed. Extremely intense peril, very scary images.

Sex

Full frontal nudity, sexual references, including rape.

Language

Very strong language.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking and drug use.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that 28 Days Later is very scary and deeply disturbing. It has extreme and graphic peril and violence. Many characters are killed. Characters use very strong language. There is frontal male nudity. Characters drink and take drugs. There are sexual references, as well as sexual violence -- including rape.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byFZNNJ July 21, 2010

Great Movie Squeamish Beware

This movie, although graphic, is a very good rendition of what zombie movies should be like. The overtones of helping others through whatever happens can come a... Continue reading
Adult Written bymovie master February 22, 2011
this movie is good for kids 16 and older no younger too much blood lots of bad language but i like it so i give it 5 stars for people ages 13 and younger absolu... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written bygraciepie99 August 15, 2013

Gracie's review

I first watched this movie aged 13. I'm Bipolar and one of my traits is that I'm not easily disturbed. At all. I sat through the whole movie and didn... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written bycerealkiller189 February 14, 2012

A much better job than 28 Weeks.

Unlike its sequel,28 Weeks Later,28 Days Later dosent rely on heavy gore and blood to shock viewers.The movie pulls you into the atmosphere right at the beginni... Continue reading

What's the story?

This is a movie about a viral apocalypse. It has very scary zombies and jump-out-at-you attacks, but that is not what is most unsettling. Like the small group of survivors, we are cut off from any information and don't know whether it's London, the UK, or the whole world that has been almost entirely wiped out. There is no way to know who or what to trust, no basis on which to evaluate alternative courses of action. When anyone becomes infected with the virus, there are only 10-20 seconds to kill him before he becomes a crazed, lethally infectious zombie. There is no time to plan to rebuild civilization. Survival is the only imperative. And then, just as we begin to process -- if not accept -- all of that, the movie shifts into a whole other level of scariness. The zombies are terrifying, but they are not as bad as the "human" survivors, those people capable of higher reasoning and moral principles and therefore of the most profound and disturbing betrayal.

Is it any good?

Director Danny Boyle (Trainspotting) keeps the audience off-balance. Nightmarish quick cuts and digital video give the look of the movie a gritty, hallucinatory immediacy. Boyle also makes brilliant use of the empty artifacts, from the deserted London streets to a once-magnificent Gosford Park-style country house, now occupied by military, who eat rotting food around the table once used for glittering parties. Each character gets just one defining quality (idealistic Jim, tough Selena, stout-hearted Frank, ingenue Hannah), but that just adds to the sense of urgency -- we don't have time to get to know them, just as they don't have time to get to know one another.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the different characters' responses to ultimate questions about the meaning of life. Who is responsible for what happened? What will the world be like 10 years later?

Movie details

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