Airplane II: The Sequel

Movie review by
Brian Costello, Common Sense Media
Airplane II: The Sequel Movie Poster Image
Classic comedy with frequent sex and drug references.
  • PG
  • 1982
  • 85 minutes

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

As both a very silly comedy and a parody of airplane disaster movies of the 1970s, there isn't much in the way of positive messages.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The characters are generally too ridiculously over the top to be considered positive role models.

Violence

Comedic violence throughout the movie. During a long-winded story told in a mental hospital, a group of patients is shown putting guns to their heads and heard, off-camera, shooting the guns. A man punches a woman in the face after hearing another man yell the last name "Striker!" A space shuttle is shown crashing into a space station. A man is shown trying to shave while the space shuttle crashes, causing the man to cut his face and bleed. A boy asks his father about his rape trial while they're waiting to take off from Earth.

Sex

Frequent sexual innuendo throughout the movie. Naked breasts shown as women pass through a metal detector in an airport. During the very beginning, the movie does a Star Wars parody of the set-up scrolling off into space that segues into the beginning of a description of two people about to have sex. A priest is shown reading a magazine called Altar Boy, and turns it sideways, presumably to look at the centerfold. This priest is later shown attempting to engage in oral sex with the person sitting next to him. At an airport help desk, a woman asks, "Should I fake my orgasms?" A computer is shown smiling after a female flight attendant is told that she's going to have to "blow the computer." During a discussion on television, a hearing-impaired translator makes a gesture known for signifying masturbation.

Language

Frequent profanity: "bulls--t," "s--t," "a--hole," "crap," "hell."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Characters are frequently shown smoking cigarettes, especially in the air traffic control room. Characters drink alcohol. A female flight attendant is shown smoking a joint. Reference is made to "bad acid." In a corporate boardroom, a group of kids are shown smoking cigars.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Airplane II: The Sequel is the 1982 second installment from the classic parodies of 1970s airline disaster films. Although it's still laugh-out-loud hilarious, there are plenty of jokes revolving around sexual innuendo -- as well as jokes involving a priest who reads Altar Boy magazine and attempts to have oral sex with the person sitting next to him -- that make this film a better choice for mature viewers. Nothing is sacred here, and there are plenty of jokes involving sex and drugs. Comedic violence is frequent. Bare breasts are on display. Frequent profanity includes "bulls--t" and "a---hole.  Also, there's frequent smoking, especially in the air traffic control room. Don't let the PG rating fool you; if released today, the movie most likely would be rated PG-13.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written byMoviecriticdude101 January 23, 2018

funny but not the original

my personal rating PG-13 grade B-
Adult Written byE S December 18, 2017
Teen, 14 years old Written byMOVIES1 June 25, 2018

Very good movie, but don’t watch with younger children.

It was a great movie but is uncomfortable to watch with younger kids. A friend of mine watched it with a younger brother and it raised A LOT of questions!

What's the story?

After heroically piloting an out-of-control plane to safety, Ted Striker (Robert Hays) becomes a test pilot for a passenger space shuttle bound for the moon but is sent to a mental ward when he tries to tell everyone that the shuttle is faulty. He manages to escape the mental ward, board the shuttle (called "Mayflower 1"), and try to rescue the passengers when the computer decides it would rather pilot the shuttle to the sun. This problem is further exacerbated by a mad bomber who's determined to blow up the plane, and -- oh, yes -- the Mayflower 1 has run out of coffee.

Is it any good?

In an interesting twist, Airplane! and its sequel -- called, appropriately enough, AIRPLANE II: THE SEQUEL -- have held up better than the 1970s disaster movies they were parodying. The sight gags, puns, pratfalls, satire, and rapid-fire wit are as unrelenting in Airplane II: The Sequel​ as in the original. Some jokes work better than others, and some jokes haven't held up past the movie's initial 1982 release, but, on the whole, this is still a very funny comedy.

Indeed, quite a few of the jokes (references to the Moral Majority, for instance) will go over the heads of younger viewers, and some of the jokes (especially ones involving priests) will be offensive to some. Nonetheless, most teens and parents will find themselves laughing out loud more than a few times. There is absolutely nothing serious about this movie, and somehow it's managed to stand the test of time. Just don't let the PG rating fool you; if released today, the movie would be rated PG-13.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about comedy in movies. What are some of the different kinds of jokes presented throughout the movie?

  • What aspects of the movie seem dated, and what aspects still manage to be funny for today's audiences?

  • What surprised you the most about how airports (or spaceports) were conveyed in 1982?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

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