Barney: Celebrating Around the World

Movie review by
Carrie R. Wheadon, Common Sense Media
Barney: Celebrating Around the World Movie Poster Image
Globetrotting dino treats tots to dynamite dances.
  • NR
  • 2008
  • 54 minutes

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 17+
Based on 6 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Songs about friendship, learning about and celebrating other cultures, learning to get along and take turns, dealing with nervousness when you try something new, practicing patience -- all good stuff except for all the excitement and singing about ice cream.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this DVD is best for kids ages 2-4 who like Barney on TV. It's a good introduction to other countries and traditions and stresses friendship. Parents who have trouble getting young kids to eat their veggies may dislike the part where playground kids all sing the praises of ice cream and eat three scoops at a time.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 2 year old Written byyourmomlol May 16, 2010

so good

ohh rub me the other way
Parent of a 10, 11, 12, 14, and 16 year old Written byCrawfo540 July 1, 2009

Not actually good

People are always talking about Barney being educational. The problem is, Barney is only hiding the actual truth. What I think is, that, if you want to educate... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written by99IsMyLuckyNumber March 5, 2011

OMG FREAKY BARNY

OMG BARNEY IS TERRIBLE HE SCARED MY FRIEND PAYTON BADLY. HE GOES AROUND SAYING I LOVE YOU. MY SISTER CRIED AT BARNEY'S SCARY FACE. BARNEY IS IMPLIED TO BE... Continue reading
Kid, 10 years old March 2, 2010

Sucks

IT'S NOT GOOD!! look at him, polluting kids of stupidness... Making them crazy!!! touching them!!!

What's the story?

Barney's friends Tracy and Ben want to have a party and are looking for some inspiration. Lucky for them the Imagination Train is on hand to whisk them around the globe where they see all kinds of celebrations and meet new friends. In Brazil kids dance the samba in their carnival costumes; in Ireland Barney shows St. Patrick's Day dancers he can keep up with the Lord of the Dance any day; in Japan new kimono-ed friends celebrate the Cherry Blossom Festival; in Kenya families hold a lively music festival; and in India it's time for Diwali with dancing and treats. When Ben and Tracy return to plan their party they finally agree on a theme: friendship.

Is it any good?

Barney on TV may be tough for parents to sit through, but this DVD makes the task a little easier, thanks to all the lively international dancing -- mostly by kids in traditional dress. Kids love the big purple guy and he's always passing on such nice lessons for kids to hear, so we make the effort to hang in there, even though and it's impossible to get that "I love you, you love me" song out of your head days later.

Mixed in with all the jigging and samba-ing there are still a number of ditties on ice cream, taking turns, playing outside, trying new things, and more. They really pack in the songs to the point where this is a bit long for kids to sit through. Better to take it a few countries at a time, getting up to samba whenever the mood strikes.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about dancing. What dances did you like? Can you dance like the kids from Kenya or from India? Can you put on loud shoes and make tapping noises with your feet like the dancers from Ireland?

Movie details

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