Insidious: Chapter 2

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
Insidious: Chapter 2 Movie Poster Image
Popular with kidsParents recommend
Horror sequel brings more of the same creepy scares.
  • PG-13
  • 2013
  • 105 minutes

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 10 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 53 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages
Characters try to help one another in this movie, even entering into frightening and potentially dangerous situations in order to do so.
Positive Role Models & Representations
The supporting characters -- the paranormal investigators -- are the ones who seem the most heroic and interesting. They're forever forging ahead into frightening and unknown situations in the quest for knowledge and also to help others. They're sympathetic, brave, and supportive.
Violence
The movie is filled with very scary images and sounds. Some of the sudden shocks will send sensitive viewers jumping out of their seats. Some disturbing images come up as well, as when the father is seen attacking his wife and attempting to attack his children. In these scenes, characters hurl household objects at one another and beat each other up. Ghosts attack a young boy. Characters use a Taser gun and a syringe full of sedative. A dead body is shown, and a tiny amount of blood is seen, in a photograph and on a knocked-out tooth.
Sex
A married couple is shown kissing.
 
Language
A few uses of "s--t," plus "hell," "goddamn," "oh my God," etc. A character refers to his "nuts" after falling down in a dark room.
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Insidious: Chapter 2 is the sequel to 2011's terrifying horror hit Insidious, featuring many of the same characters in similar situations. Like the original, there's little or no gore, sex, or language (a couple of uses of "s--t," plus "goddamn," "hell," etc.), but you can definitely expect a lot of very scary, disturbing, and shocking imagery, as well as some fighting (characters bash each other with household objects). The main young boy isn't separated from his parents in this film, but he is shown to be in danger. Bottom line? If you're not a veteran horror fan, this is the stuff nightmares are made of.

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User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 6-year-old Written byChristianMother101 September 18, 2013

Excellent!

I'll admit, I was wary when I went to watch this movie with my six-year-old, however, roughly 46 minutes into the movie, i looked over at my daughter and f... Continue reading
Adult Written byLUCY ANN CRAIN105 March 26, 2020

Little scarier

This movie has the same creepy thrills and chills but is a little scarier. I know a lot as people will say it was not as scary but I was 10 when I watched this... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byHorrorMovieFanatic November 1, 2016

Horror Sequel Brings More Of The Same Creepy Scares

"Insidious: Chapter 2" is a horror/thriller/mystery/drama film by James Wan, the director of "The Conjuring Series", "Saw Series",... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old June 26, 2015

Better then the first story wise, but lacks some of the originals' creepy/scary qualities.

Like the first "Insidious", creepy shadows and figures are seen, some violent hand to hand combat, a needle that makes people pass out, terror of ambi... Continue reading

What's the story?

In INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2, after Josh Lambert (Patrick Wilson) returned from the Further -- the spooky world of the dead -- with his missing son, Dalton (Ty Simpkins), at the end of Insidious, it seemed like everything was going to be all right. Think again. The medium, Elise (Lin Shaye), is dead, and Josh is a suspect. Josh's wife, Renai (Rose Byrne), starts hearing and seeing scary things again, and even Josh doesn't seem quite right. Meanwhile, Josh's mom, Lorraine (Barbara Hershey), contacts Elise's assistants, Specs (Leigh Whannell) and Tucker (Angus Sampson), for help, which leads to an incident from her past. Will the family survive another trip to the Further?

Is it any good?

This movie simply presents more of the same stuff we saw in Insidious, and it no longer feels quite so fresh. The "Further," a great idea in the previous movie, is no longer an unknown entity, the characters aren't explored any more deeply, and even the ghosts have no new tricks.
 
But just because Insidious: Chapter 2 isn't as good as the original doesn't make this sequel a bad movie. Director James Wan continues to develop his touch for truly scary horror. Unlike many of today's camera-shakers, Wan uses smooth, three-dimensional space and offscreen sound to generate his scares. His camera moves freely through houses and buildings, using natural obstacles like walls and doorways to generate prickly suspense. Like his film The Conjuring, it's also refreshingly free of gore, profanity, and sex. The weird, atonal score by Joseph Bishara adds another nightmarish layer. The bottom line is that it's still quite scary.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Insidious: Chapter 2's violence. How much blood and gore is shown? Do you need that stuff to make a "horror" movie?
  • Is the movie scary? How does it compare to other scary movies you've seen?
  • What's the general appeal of horror movies? How is this ghost story different from a movie about, say, a serial killer?
  • How does Insidious: Chapter 2 compare to the original Insidious?

Movie details

For kids who love scares

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