Leo the Lion

Movie review by
Brian Costello, Common Sense Media
Leo the Lion Movie Poster Image
Horrible animated tale about a bullied vegetarian lion.
  • NR
  • 2013
  • 77 minutes

Parents say

age 7+
Based on 5 reviews

Kids say

age 5+
Based on 13 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Educational Value

Meant to entertain rather than educate.

Positive Messages

Any pro-vegetarian messages are muddled due to the fact that lions are obligate carnivores -- meaning, even if they could choose to be vegetarians, they must eat the meat of other animals to obtain the nutrients they need, and their bodies are not suitable for the digestion of plant-based food.

Positive Role Models & Representations

While Leo is a likable enough character who sticks to his dietary convictions even as the other animals in the jungle openly mock him, there's no getting around the fact that lions are physiologically incapable of being vegetarians. The remaining characters are too one-dimensional to be considered positive role models. 

Violence & Scariness

The lead character's mother perishes in a river leading to a waterfall. Poachers shoot tranquilizer darts at wild animals in the hopes of capturing them for zoos. Animals frequently shown in peril -- narrowly avoiding falling to their deaths, fighting each other, fleeing predators and poachers. 

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Leo the Lion is a 2013 computer-animated movie about a kind young vegetarian lion who is verbally bullied by fellow lions for not eating meet and who "adopts" two baby elephants and must protect them from predators as well as an evil "alpha elephant." Aside from the inescapable fact that lions are obligate carnivores and therefore could not be vegetarians even if they wanted to be, this is a horrible Pixar rip-off with terrible songs, annoying voices, subpar animation, and a poorly executed story line. Parents looking for a movie that shows vegetarians in a positive light should look elsewhere, and everyone else should avoid this movie simply because it is so insufferable. Leo's mother dies within the first five minutes by drowning in a river that leads to a waterfall while in pursuit of a zebra. Leo is often the target of bullying lions -- as well as other animals in the jungle -- because he is a vegetarian. Also, as a vegetarian, Leo looks sickly -- his ribs stick out as if he is undernourished. There is really nothing worthwhile about this movie. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byKathy Cole April 19, 2016
this is the best movie I've seen in years.
Adult Written byGamingIncredibl... July 27, 2017

Terrible, but worth picking errors in it.

Wow - we laughed at times, not because it was funny but how horrible the design, graphic rendering and voices. It feels like the movie was wrongly distribute... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written byWhet April 28, 2016

Seriously

This movie was so bad. At random points it went into slow motion. The subtitles did not match the dialogue. It ended with elephant lion babies. Im pretty sure t... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byi hate leo the lion February 5, 2018

i made this account just to hate on leo the lion and i will never use it again

this movie scarred me for life. the antelope's teeth fall out non-stop, the lion has kids with an elephant, the monkeys are clearly some sort of evil monst... Continue reading

What's the story?

Leo the Lion (Daniel Amerman) is a vegetarian and is therefore shunned, bullied, and ridiculed not only by his fellow lions but also by many other species in the jungle. But he does have some friends, including an elephant mother who has just given birth to two babies. While the evil Maximus Elephante plots to become king of the elephants and the jungle as a whole, the baby elephants believe that Leo is their father. Leo must take these elephants, along with a monkey, a cheetah, and a zebra, home to their mother, but along the way, they must avoid human poachers and jungle predators such as hyenas and vultures.

Is it any good?

This movie is so insufferably bad that it seems reasonable to suspect that the meat industry bankrolled it in the hopes of turning off anyone who might be considering becoming a vegetarian. The animation is subpar at best, the voices are annoying, the songs painful are to listen to, and even the pro-vegetarian message is confusing -- apparently Leo is a vegetarian because he is nice and, according to the song at the movie's end, he prefers cheese, ice cream sundaes, and bananas to, say, zebra meat. 

Which raises the most glaring problem with this movie. Lions are obligate carnivores. Even if they were capable of choosing a wedge of provolone cheese to the prey they chase, kill, and eat in their natural habitat, they must eat meat to obtain the nutrients they need to survive. Furthermore, they're incapable of digesting any meal-size portions of vegetables. With so many omnivores and herbivores in the world, why would a lion -- a lion who looks underfed with its ribs sticking out -- be chosen to be the torchbearer of a vegetarian lifestyle? This inaccuracy alone undercuts any pro-vegetarian message this movie might convey, but even if a viewer could go that far to suspend disbelief, this is still a shoddy and just plain bad movie. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about vegetarianism. What are some reasons not to eat meat? Do you know any vegetarians?

  • What are some of the messages this movie attempts to convey? Do you think the movie makes its point? Why, or why not?

  • What are some of the ways in which this movie attempts to copy Pixar movies? 

  • If you could remake this movie, how would you improve it?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

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