No Escape

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
No Escape Movie Poster Image
Generic, violent social media-themed horror story.
  • R
  • 2020
  • 92 minutes

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Movie is about social media and "need" to generate more views, more likes, more subscribes via increasingly intense content. Unfortunately, it has little to say on the subject other than stating the obvious.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Main character is a self-obsessed livestream internet star whose main concern is "content." He has a group of friends, but they seem assembled around him rather than with him. Very little indication of teamwork or friendship. Cast is somewhat diverse, but main character is a White male.

Violence

Brief scenes of women being tortured. Characters are shot, blood spurts shown. One character beats another to death, slamming his head on ground. Naked corpse shown; character cuts into the corpse with a scalpel, removes a key from the bloody entrails. Other blood and gore shown. Characters strapped into various torture devices, given electrical shocks, nearly drowned, killed with saw, shoved down elevator shaft. Guns are drawn and used to threaten. Table full of bloody torture tools. Man threateningly hits on a woman in a bar. Bar fight with grabbing, shoving.

Sex

Couple in bed together. One character leaves another's hotel room in the morning. Same-sex and opposite-sex kissing. Sex-related talk. Naked male corpse, penis shown.

Language

Strong language includes "f--k," "s--t," "p---y," "motherf----r," "bitch," and "idiot," plus exclamatory use of "Jesus Christ," "oh my God."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Multiple vodka shots and social drinking, brief drug-snorting in a nightclub.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that No Escape (formerly titled Follow Me) is a gory but unsurprising horror/thriller about a livestream internet star who goes to a deadly escape room in Russia and finds himself in over his head. The violence isn't quite at "torture porn" levels, but women are threatened and subjected to torture devices, including electric shock mechanisms and tanks filling with water. Characters are killed, and there's plenty of blood and guts. Viewers will also see guns/shooting and fighting. It's suggested that characters are having sex (a couple lies in bed together, and one leaves another's hotel room), and there's kissing. Strong language includes "f--k," "s--t," "p---y," "motherf----r," and more. Characters enjoy vodka shots and snort drugs in a nightclub.

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User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byRealReviewsByCa... September 22, 2020

Decent movie

I have two daughters one is 16 the other one is 11. Me and my 16 year old watched it together and it was kinda underwhelming. I don’t regret watching it but I w... Continue reading

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What's the story?

In NO ESCAPE, Cole (Keegan Allen) is a successful vlogger who heads to Russia with his team to celebrate the vlog's 10th anniversary. They plan to do a show-stopping broadcast inside the ultimate escape room. While they're out enjoying themselves in a nightclub, Russian gangster Alexei (Ronen Rubinstein) starts harassing Cole's girlfriend, Erin (Holland Roden), leading to a fight. The next day, the escape room proves to be rather intense, as Cole is forced to dig a key out of a corpse, and his friends -- including Samantha (Siya), Dash (George Janko), and Thomas (Denzel Whitaker) -- are locked into torture devices. When the game ends and the timer runs out, the friends still can't seem to escape -- and more horrors await.

Is it any good?

A vague copycat of the successful Saw franchise formula, this horror/thriller lacks interesting puzzles, likable characters, and memorable shocks and has an unsettling level of violence toward women. The generically titled No Escape -- which originally had an equally generic title, Follow Me -- focuses on a group of diverse friends, though they seem forced together by the script, rather than sharing an organic chemistry. There's very little personality in any of them. Cole is self-obsessed and thinks only about "content," but the movie doesn't have any idea how to satirize or comment on him. That's just who he is.

The movie's various puzzles and deaths manage to be uninteresting and not particularly gory or shocking, but at the same time it's a little too interested in inflicting nastiness on the female characters. And the grand finale is sadly all too predictable, because the movie gives away the answer early on in a specifically placed line of dialogue. (It's also pretty dumb.) All of this adds up to a pointedly unmemorable movie, largely springing from the fact that it's next to impossible to care. No Escape will inspire viewers to head for the nearest and most accessible exit.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about No Escape's violence. Is it thrilling? Shocking? What's the difference?

  • What's the appeal of horror movies? Why do people sometimes like to be scared?

  • What does the movie have to say about social media celebrity? Is it glamorous? What are the downsides?

  • What values are implied or shown in the movie's sex-related moments?

Movie details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love scares

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