Persepolis

Movie review by
Sandie Angulo Chen, Common Sense Media
Persepolis Movie Poster Image
Animated coming-of-age tale is poignant, mature.
  • PG-13
  • 2007
  • 120 minutes
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 23 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive messages

Marjane tries to keep her grandmother's promise to be true to herself and to honor her roots despite all the changes going on around her.

Violence

Several characters die, either by firing squad, public hanging, or falling while running from the police. Blood is depicted as black, oozing from a shadowy/black figure. Other scenes portray bombings, revolutionary battles, and dead victims. Marjane's mother reveals that since it's illegal to execute a virgin, unmarried female prisoners are forced to marry soldiers and have "their virginity taken" first.

Sex

Marjane kisses and hugs a couple of characters and catches a boyfriend in bed with another young woman. She admits that she's not virgin and tells her virgin friends back home that sex is good depending on the guy.

Language

Language includes "bastard," "s--t," "dick," and "ass" (dialogue is in French with English subtitles).

Consumerism

Bruce Lee poster, Bee Gees album, Iron Maiden album, the song "Eye of the Tiger."

Drinking, drugs & smoking

A suicidal Marjane takes a lot of pills, and Marjane and her parents attend secret parties where the adults tend to get drunk. As a teenager, Marjane drinks and smokes cigarettes and pot/hash. She also drinks and smokes cigarettes as an adult.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that although this film -- an adaptation of graphic novelist Marjane Satrapi's critically acclaimed memoir about growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution -- is animated, it's aimed at adults. There are many references to the atrocities (mostly executions and bombings) of life before, during, and after the revolution. Several scenes involve secret parties during which secular Iranians drink and smoke; as a teenager living in Europe, Marjane also drinks, smokes, tries hash, and sleeps with two guys (at one point, feeling suicidal, she also takes lots of pills). If teens are interested, they'll learn a lot about the harsh realities of life in an oppressive culture. It's worth noting that there are two versions of the film: The original is in French with subtitles; the other is dubbed in English.

User Reviews

Adult Written bynatashabee April 9, 2008
Adult Written byImaMira April 9, 2008

a fantastic film for teens & adults

This is an amazing film, and I highly recommend it for older teens & adults. The sex, violence, & drug/alcohol use are perfectly appropriate (n... Continue reading
Kid, 9 years old July 10, 2010
Kid, 7 years old July 10, 2010

What's the story?

Based on writer-director Marjane Satrapi's award-winning graphic novel, PERSEPOLIS closely follows her life as she comes of age in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. Narrated by Chiara Mastroianni as the adult Marjane, the alternatingly funny and heartbreaking story chronicles how Marjane's immediate family kept their ideals under increasingly oppressive regimes.

Is it any good?

Like Art Spiegelman's seminal Holocaust-themed graphic novel Maus, this stirring film explains history from the point of view of one family. More particularly, it focuses on Marjane herself -- from grade-schooler to young adult. The secular, educated Satrapis survive as loved ones are imprisoned, tortured, and executed -- first under the Shah and later under the Islamic revolutionaries. Throughout the years, Marjane is drawn to Western popular culture from Bruce Lee and Bee Gees to Iron Maiden and the Rocky III anthem "Eye of the Tiger" -- even though it's forbidden to own any unapproved books or music.

Marjane's grounding force is her rebellious grandma (voiced by Danielle Darrieux), who makes the girl promise not to lose sight of her family's progressive beliefs and the reasons why her beloved uncle and countless others have died. But sometimes Marjane can't help acting tad immature -- even reckless. That's what makes the film so touching: Amid cultural repression, Marjane, her family, and their close friends still manage to find small ways to subvert authority. And thanks to the regular doses of adolescent humor, this distinctly Iranian tale becomes a universal story anyone can appreciate.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how "the West" is portrayed in the film. Why is American pop culture banned in Iran? What makes it threatening?

  • How is Marjane's family different? How does Marjane "betray" her heritage once she's abroad? What did you learn about Iranian history and culture from the film?

  • Do you think that animation was an effective way to tell Marjane's story? How would it have been different if it was live action?

Movie details

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