Roma

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
Roma Movie Poster Image
Cuaron's personal meditation on family is masterful, mature.
  • R
  • 2018
  • 135 minutes

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Kids say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Bravery is required to endure hardship. It's important to face your fears if you want to come to terms with an inner conflict.

Positive Role Models & Representations

For most of the film, Cleo simply struggles and endures, but she becomes a hero when she rescues two children from drowning in rough ocean waves; her act is doubly brave, considering she can't swim.

Violence

Intense sequence of a student demonstration becoming a riot. A man shoots another man. Guns pointed. Blood shown. Dead bodies. Tension, arguing, yelling.

Sex

Sustained sequence of full-frontal male nudity; a naked man performs martial arts moves. Implied sex between a man and a woman; the woman becomes pregnant. Couples kiss. An extramarital affair is suggested/mentioned.

Language

Uses of "f--k" and "s--t," plus "a--hole," "crap," "goddamn."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Social drinking. Some smoking.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Roma is a drama, in Spanish and Mixtec with English subtitles, from Oscar-winning director Alfonso Cuaron (Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Gravity). Telling the story of a maid and the troubled family she lives with, circa 1971-1972, it's a gorgeous, moving masterpiece, but it includes some very mature material. There's a scene in which a student demonstration turns violent; guns are drawn, and characters are shot and killed. Some blood is shown. There's also tension, arguing, and shouting. A sustained sequence of full-frontal nudity is shown as a naked man demonstrates his martial arts moves. Kissing is shown, and sex is suggested. "S--t" and "f--k" are used (spelled out in the subtitles). Characters drink socially, mainly at a New Year's party, and smoke.

User Reviews

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Teen, 14 years old Written bySpencerS123 December 5, 2018

Beautiful in all ways

Saw it at a film festival and was BLOWN AWAY. Best film of the year, if not the decade. Bound to become a classic. A scene of non-sexual full-frontal male nudit... Continue reading

What's the story?

In ROMA, in late 1971, Cleo (Yalitza Aparicio) works as a maid for a family in Mexico City's Roma district. Cleo has a good relationship with the family's three children, whom she takes care of, and things seem to be going well enough. But the husband and wife's relationship is under some strain, and before long the husband departs, leaving Sofia (Marina de Tavira) in charge. Meanwhile, Cleo becomes involved with a young man named Fermin (Jorge Antonio Guerrero) and gets pregnant. Fermin disappears, but Sofia lovingly agrees to help Cleo with the pregnancy. Cleo tracks down Fermin, who brushes her off, denying any involvement. Meanwhile, student protests turn violent all over the city, and Cleo finds herself facing her deepest fears in more ways than one.

Is it any good?

Director Alfonso Cuaron follows up the excellent Gravity the best way he can, by going back to his childhood to make this loving ode to the women who raised him. The film is a poetic, crystalline visual glory, demonstrating Cuaron's graceful, effortless, yet complete command over light, space, and rhythm. It recalls films like Sunrise and The Night of the Hunter, as well as European masters like Bresson, Fellini, and Antonioni. But thematically, it's all Cuaron's, as he follows his characters moving through impressively beautiful, massive, and sometimes threatening space. He continues to use his trademark sustained, unbroken shots, and while he's already proven himself a master at the use of color, here his use of black-and-white proves that he's just as adept with shadows and textures. (The opening shot, with an airplane reflected in a puddle on the floor, is a beauty.)

Cleo is a curious character, seemingly impassive, almost as if shy to show her emotions. But when she does, it's tender and moving. Roma really puts her through the ringer, but as in Cuaron's other stories of women (A Little Princess, Gravity, etc.), his approach is delicate and affectionate; he never bludgeons. Cleo's trials and tribulations are foreshadowed with little omens, such as a small earthquake in a hospital or a fire, that are almost indirect suggestions of conflict. Even moments of intensity, as when a demonstration turns into a violent riot or Cleo gives birth, are handled as if the viewer were in shock or disbelief. The filmmaker is on our side, not trying to bash us over the head. Most affecting and most memorable are the small, fleeting moments of joy and beauty, touches that make Roma another Cuaron masterpiece.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the violence in Roma. Is it intense? Is it shocking? How does the filmmaker achieve these reactions?

  • How does the movie depict sex? What values are imparted? Are there consequences to sex?

  • Is Cleo a role model? Why or why not? Is she portrayed with dignity and humanity?

  • How are the men depicted in the movie? How do they behave? Is there any male behavior worth emulating? What can be learned from this behavior?

Movie details

For kids who love dramas

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