Satanic

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
Satanic Movie Poster Image
Awful characters deal with the devil in forgettable horror.
  • R
  • 2016
  • 85 minutes

Parents say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 17+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

Characters are fascinated with all things satanic, but not because of genuine curiosity; nothing is explored or discussed (they'd rather make fun of it). Could be considered a warning about not being a terrible person (i.e. don't be rude, make fun of others, judge, etc.). Characters are all punished, although not necessarily for these reasons.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The characters are annoying, pushy, argumentative, and judgmental from the very start, and they never get any better.

Violence

Gory scene of self-inflicted throat-slicing, with spurting blood. Very brief spooky images. Horrifying scars, scratches, and bloody wounds, briefly shown. A scene of guns and shooting (no one is hit). Dead crows, with some blood. Brief fight, with punching in face. Spoken descriptions of violent events. Vomiting, spitting, and urinating. Shouting, sounds of fighting through hotel walls.

Sex

Topless woman (in a non-sexual context). Strong sexual innuendo.

Language

Constant swearing, including multiple uses of "f--k," "motherf----r," "s--t," "bulls---," "horses--t," "c--k," "p---y," "t-ts," "a--hole," "f---tards," "cumball," "bitch," "prick," "d--k," "damn," "goddamn," "hell," "idiot," "junkies," "whores," "a big pair," plus "swear to Christ."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Brief scene of young adult characters smoking pot. Characters drink several beers, getting mildly drunk. A character briefly smokes a cigarette.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Satanic is a horror movie about four young adults (including one played by Modern Family's Sarah Hyland) on a tour of several "satanic" locations in Los Angeles; naturally, they get into supernatural trouble. There are some spooky moments, but the characters are so awful and irritating that it's hard to care. There's a gory self-inflicted neck-slicing, plus other disturbing (though briefly shown) wounds, scratches, and scars. A brief fight scene includes punching, and a gun is fired. There's a non-sexual scene with a topless woman, plus occasional strong innuendo. Language is constant and extremely strong, including "f--k," "s--t," every conceivable permutation of both, and then some. The main characters briefly smoke pot and drink beer, getting mildly drunk; one character also briefly smokes a cigarette.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byFallen A. May 26, 2017

Its great if you want to be watching what feels like 3/4 of a movie

Was excited and honestly was enjoying... was getting to the climax and...... it ended. Now left sitting here feeling like I wasnt allowed to have the last bite... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old October 11, 2016

Dumb, boring, bloody horror thriller is not scary, nor interesting.

My rating:R for bloody violence, partial nudity, and language.
Teen, 13 years old Written byMana_ October 15, 2016

Boring,Not worth it

This showed partial nudity it said here only topless shirt but you could see a womens breasts. The same women was kissing all of the three adults including the... Continue reading

What's the story?

On their spring break, Chloe (Sarah Hyland); her boyfriend, David (Steven Krueger); her cousin, Elise (Clara Mamet); and Elise's boyfriend, Seth (Justin Chon), decide to take a tour of Los Angeles' satanic landmarks before heading to Coachella. Following a man (Anthony Carrigan) from a satanic bookshop, they discover some kind of ritual taking place, and a girl, Alice (Sophie Dalah), fleeing from the scene. Alice picks up Seth's lost phone, and the friends agree to put her up for the night. But she unexpectedly takes her own life, warning them that she'll "see them soon." Not long after, strange things start happening, and Chloe finds herself in a terrible nightmare, unable to escape.

Is it any good?

This third-rate horror movie gets off to a bad start with its annoying, horrible characters. It's very slow to get going, and when it finally reaches a fairly spooky climax, it's too late to care. The characters are rude and selfish; they constantly swear and bicker, they're no fun to be around, and they quickly run through any kind of goodwill an audience might give them. When they get into trouble, it's not because of any kind of honest mistake, but rather because they're being awful.

Satanic's plot requires them to stay put in Los Angeles long after they should have left, and this puts a further drag on the storytelling. It's only when the foursome finally decides to leave that director Jeffrey G. Hunt manages some mildly inventive, haunted house-type chills, thanks to a dark, abandoned industrial building lit only by cell phones. Unfortunately, by that time Satanic comes across as little more than a technical exercise, because the characters have already ceased to matter.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Satanic's violence. How does it make you feel? How do the filmmakers achieve that? What's the impact of media violence on kids?

  • Is the movie scary? What's the difference between scary and gory? What is the appeal of horror movies?

  • Why do you think the characters are so interested in exploring this dark world? Have you ever been curious about something that seemed dangerous?

Movie details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love scares

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate