Sex Drive

Movie review by
S. Jhoanna Robledo, Common Sense Media
Sex Drive Movie Poster Image
Vulgar teen sex comedy lacks verve and vision.
  • R
  • 2008
  • 108 minutes

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 7 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 8 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive messages

Teens have sex with complete strangers, though it's worth noting that they're also shown shopping for condoms. Friends are loyal to one another, even when their bonds are tested. Parents seem downright invisible. Some sexist and homophobic jokes.

Violence

A man in a truck tries to mow down a naked teenager he catches having sex with his wife. Lots of yelling. Two brothers can't seem to stop fighting; the older one likes to beat up on the younger. Gunshots are fired, and a gun is brandished.

Sex

Characters listen in on others having sex; bare breasts are exposed, as well as a man's testes. Lots of talk about sex: how to have it, what makes it fun. The film opens with a teenager having a dream about someone performing a sex act on him (oral sex is implied). A sex toy features prominently in one scene. Online sex chats are shown onscreen. Characters hook up with strangers, some of whom are married.

Language

Frequent and crude; includes everything from "bitch" and "goddamn" to "c--ksucker" and "f--k."

Consumerism

Mentions of Trapper Keeper notebooks and other products, plus logos for Lifestyles condoms, Pontiac GTO, Vans shoes, and Senor Donut.

Drinking, drugs & smoking

Loads of teenage drinking, often to excess. Little discussion of the consequences, including drinking and driving. Some allusions to drug use.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this hard-R high school sex comedy -- which is squarely aimed at teens -- is "Judd Apatow lite," meaning that it has all the crassness of Apatow's comedies but not nearly as much heart or brilliance. It centers around a high school senior who's fixed on losing his virginity with the help of a girl he met on the Internet. The road trip to see her is pockmarked with one over-the-top sequence after the next, many of which feature nudity, graphic discussions of sex acts, sex toys, and more. There's also plenty of underage drinking and lots of swearing (including "f--k").

User Reviews

Parent Written bySwear Words Our Me January 5, 2014

Sexiest movie off the year.

Doing it to ladies in the butt and shoving fingers up there privates is it right cause I don't think so.
Adult Written byMicahGA April 15, 2011

A Bit Rough Around The Edges, But A Clean Finish

Sex Drive is actually a quite humorous film. I was quite surprised at how well done this movie was. Aside from all of the sexual innuendos and coarse language,... Continue reading
Teen, 15 years old Written bypeanutbuttergurl6 December 16, 2009

superbad wuz funnier

great but not as funny as superbad. just be lucky this isn't the unrated version because...that one is definitley NOW FOR KIDS
Kid, 12 years old January 8, 2012

Cut us some slack :)

Too be honest, I'm 12 and I've watched it, ok theres a lot of sex and swearing but come'on cut up some slack were not gonna go out and copy what... Continue reading

What's the story?

Ian (Josh Zuckerman) is a high school virgin in love with his best friend, Felicia (Amanda Crew). But she might have the hots for someone else. Besides, Ian's been keeping Internet company with a "sure thing." (No coincidence there; SEX DRIVE's basic plot has an awful lot in common with the John Cusack classic of the same name.) A girl he only knows by her Web name, Ms. Tasty, promises to have sex with him if he drives down from Chicago to Knoxville to meet her in his stylin' 1969 Pontiac GTO. Ian's womanizing friend, Lance (Clark Duke), thinks it's an offer he can't refuse. But here's the catch: It's not really Ian's car -- it belongs to his older brother, Rex (James Marsden), who's ferocious, fearsome, macho, and loves his car more than his family.

Is it any good?

This sometimes-hilarious but more often woefully unwitty comedy does have some appeal. Marsden, for starters. Who knew he had it in him to play comically deranged? His bearing, his cackle, his utter commitment to being totally, horrendously foul -- it's perfection. And then there's Zuckerman, who plays the awkward, self-conscious, sensitive teen to a T. In the end, viewers do actually care a little bit whether he ends up with the right girl. And, as a snarky Amish mechanic, Seth Green hits a home run every time he has a line (sadly, his appearance is much too brief).

But honestly, that's pretty much it. Because though director Sean Anders aspires to Judd Apatow-ian (is that a word?) greatness, he doesn't display Apatow's keen ability to separate the offensive from the outrageous. Instead, what we get is crass, gratuitous, gross-out humor flecked with too few moments of pure comedy.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the consequences of underage drinking. How realistic is what happens to the teen characters in this movie? What do you think would happen to them in real life if they got drunk? Families can also discuss whether the film portrays teens -- and, by extension, teen life -- accurately? If so, how? What issues does the film address? Was Ian's decision to drive so far to tryst with a stranger adventurous or foolhardy? What about his intent pursuit of losing his virginity? Why is it so important to him? Is that realistic?

Movie details

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