Takers

Movie review by
Jeffrey M. Anderson, Common Sense Media
Takers Movie Poster Image
Heist movie lacks logic but has violence to spare.
  • PG-13
  • 2010
  • 107 minutes

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 7 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 9 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this movie.

Positive Messages

The five robbers often demonstrate good teamwork, but it's always in the name of crime. Characters can't trust one another in this movie, and several are hiding something. Violence is committed without consequences, and more often than not, violence is seen as a way out.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The most "admirable" characters here are all thieves and robbers. They're the ones who exhibit the best teamwork and problem-solving skills, although always to bad ends. As for the other characters, there's a crooked cop and a cop obsessed to the point of neglecting his family and his health.

Violence

The movie is filled with over-the-top action and fighting sequences. Characters single-handedly take on many opponents, and there are acrobatic chase scenes throughout the city. Guns are drawn, and shots are fired, sometimes resulting in dead bodies. There are few consequences to these actions, other than "an eye for an eye." Several explosions.

Sex

After a successful heist, a character celebrates by wading naked into a pool where two pretty girls are waiting for him (no sensitive body parts are shown). A man proposes to his girlfriend, and they kiss passionately. Some sexual banter.

Language

Very frequent use of "s--t," plus "goddamn," "bitch," "ass," "damn," "hell," and "Jesus Christ" (as an exclamation).

Consumerism

A McDonald's billboard is seen in passing.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

A supporting character has a drug problem and is in rehab; she checks out early and falls off the wagon. She's never seen doing drugs, but another character refers to her as a "crackhead." She also smokes cigarettes. Other characters smoke cigars, as well as sample champagne and fine scotch (though no one gets drunk; these things are mainly used as status symbols).

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that violence permeates this action-oriented heist movie, which co-stars headline-grabbing musician Chris Brown. Many characters die without consequence, and violence seems to be a way out -- or an ending -- for most of the characters. Language is strong, with many uses of "s--t," "goddamn," and "bitch." Many characters smoke cigars or drink champagne or fine scotch as status symbols, and a supporting character has a drug problem (though viewers never see her take drugs). In one scene, one of the robbers wades naked into a pool where two pretty girls are waiting for him, but nothing sensitive is shown. Don't look for positive messages or role models here; ultimately, this is a movie about a bunch of criminals doing what they do best.

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User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byNYCdudeInVa September 17, 2010
This movie, because there are so many adult themes, should have been rated "R." What has not been mentioned, (I assume, to not give away one of the... Continue reading
Adult Written byCal Jasons July 16, 2019

Omg so good

Just let them do it
Teen, 17 years old Written byBirsen Uyar March 30, 2020
Teen, 14 years old Written byTheguy521 June 15, 2011

Really

Get a life you can watch a PG movie with worse things in it. Some commercials have worse scenes in it. School teachers have said worse things than in that movie...

What's the story?

Five crafty robbers -- Gordon (Idris Elba), Jake (Michael Ealy), Jesse (Chris Brown), A.J. (Hayden Christensen), and John (Paul Walker) -- pull off an intricate heist that leaves the cops baffled. After the job, the rich robbers are about to disappear when their old partner, "Ghost" (rapper Tip "T.I." Harris), gets out of jail and shows up with a new offer. He has the route to an armored car delivery, and they'll have only five days to pull off this difficult job. (Worse, Jake has just proposed to Ghost's old girlfriend, Rachel, who's played by Zoe Saldana.)The robbers agree to take on the challenge, but LAPD detectives Jack Welles (Matt Dillon) and Eddie Hatcher (Jay Hernandez) are hot on their trail. Oddly, the clues lead them to the Russian mafia. Just how dangerous is this armored car job? And who will survive?

Is it any good?

TAKERS' disparate cast tries hard to bring some personality to the movie, but their characters seem short-changed by the bad writing. T.I. -- who also co-produced -- brings a kind of sinister, snaky quality to his ex-con, but poor Saldana fares the worst of all, showing none of the toughness she's exhibited in earlier movies. She's now just a "waiting, worrying" girlfriend.

Four credited writers and rookie director John Luessenhop can't make it credible that these five careful, meticulous planners would take on the armored car job based on information from someone they don't trust. From there, the movie falls to pieces in the midst of well-staged but poorly-shot (and ultimately ridiculous) action sequences; it's all rather rushed and joyless. The movie culminates in an increasing rain of violence, and since none of the characters has any redeeming values, it almost doesn't matter who's left standing.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the movie's violence. Was it exciting or gruesome? How did you feel about how many of the characters met their ends?

  • What are the consequences of the violence in this movie? Do they seem realistic?

  • Are the main characters sympathetic? Should they be? Does the movie glamorize the life of the bank robber?

  • One of the cops takes a bribe. Does this make him a bad guy? As bad as the bank robbers?

Movie details

For kids who love action and thrills

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