1 vs 100

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
1 vs 100 TV Poster Image
Trivia show remake for pop culture-savvy families.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 4 reviews

Kids say

age 5+
Based on 10 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The usual game-show greed. Older episodes contain some stereotyping/generalizations about intelligence and (rare) objectification of women. Overall, the tone is one of lighthearted fun.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The series features respected members of the community like firefighters and police officers as "mob" members.

Violence
Sex

Older episodes contain brief, occasional looks at women dressed in revealing clothing. Some spoken sexual innuendo; some questions offer some risque play on words.

 

Language
Consumerism

Questions occasionally refer to media titles like American Idol and Seabiscut in trivia questions/answers.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Some questions contain references to drinking (like Ouzo) and getting drunk.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this entertaining, trivia-based game show is generally innocuous, but occasionally contains some implied sexism and stereotypes. It also contains some references to drinking and getting drunk.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byhappy77801 April 9, 2008

h

This a good show. I love the trivia questions they ask! The one with the mob of kids was hilarious. You should watch this.
Parent of an infant and 1 year old Written byMIZZ BRITTANY904 March 15, 2010
Kid, 12 years old April 9, 2008

i cant wait for it to come back

i love this show so dose my mom one of the best shows on TV
Teen, 14 years old Written bycatdog5555 April 9, 2008

Great Show

I think this show is great for families because i love Bob Saget who hosts the show and i like it because of the gameplay and the idea of the show

What's the story?

1 VS 100 is a trivia-based game show that pits a solo player against a group of 100 people from all over the country. Both the contestant and the "mob" answer identical questions. The contestant moves up one step on a money ladder for every 10 mob members who answer incorrectly.But if the contestant gets the question wrong s/he immediately loses the game. Contestants lucky enough to eliminate all 100 mobsters get $50,000. The members of the mob have something at stake in the game, too. When the main contestant is eliminated, the remaining members of the mob split the winnings accrued to that point -- so they want the contestant to win as much money as possible before getting eighty-sixed.

Is it any good?

The series, which is a remake of the original hit show featuring TV veteran Bob Saget, features a mob that has been pre-recorded and digitally inserted to create the sense that they are reacting to contestants and interacting with the host, Dancing With The Stars judge Carrie Ann Inaba. As a result, it doesn't always feel very authentic.

Although it lacks the wittiness and intensity of the original, the show is still pretty entertaining. The questions on 1 vs 100 rarely call for much beyond average general interest knowledge, which makes it easy enough for viewers of all ages to play along.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how game shows can get remade to reflect current popular culture trends. What role does technology play in game shows today? Do you think this game is more exciting with a real "mob," or with people appearing on pre-recorded videos?

  • For fun, what would you do if you won $50,000?

TV details

For kids who love watching with the family

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