2 Dope Queens

TV review by
Jenny Nixon, Common Sense Media
2 Dope Queens TV Poster Image
Podcast turned late-night comedy show brings big laughs.

Parents say

age 17+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 17+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Current events are discussed and dissected in a humorous way by various comedians and performers.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Williams and Robinson are intelligent, successful young black women who talk about hot-button topics in a way that feels both inclusive and funny. Their natural charisma and obvious affection for one another shines, and they extend that warmth and friendliness to the comics and performers they feature on the show. The show isn't pushing an agenda, but its very existence -- and the diverse selection of performers featured -- makes it a standout in the late-night landscape.

Violence
Sex

Very frank talk about sexuality and related issues, often full of four-letter words.

Language

This is an HBO show, and the language reflects that. All manner of swear words are featured, uncensored, including "f--k," "s--t," and many more. 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Occasional references to drugs and drinking.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that 2 Dope Queens is a variety-style comedy series based on the WNYC podcast of the same name, hosted by former Daily Show correspondent/actress Jessica Williams and comedian/writer/performer Phoebe Robinson. There's a ton of insightful and hilarious social commentary, but the content is on the mature side -- full of four-letter words and frank talk about issues like abortion and sex.

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What's the story?

2 DOPE QUEENS is a four-part late-night comedy series hosted by Jessica Williams (The Daily Show, The Incredible Jessica James) and Phoebe Robinson (I Love Dick), who also host the popular WNYC podcast of the same name. The show was taped in front of a live audience at Brooklyn's Kings Theater, and episodes feature the hosts and their guests riffing on issues like sex, race, dating, and city life. There are interview-type segments with various celebrities, including Williams' former boss Jon Stewart and Sex and the City's Sarah Jessica Parker, as well as stand-up sets from folks like Michelle Buteau and Baron Vaughn.

Is it any good?

Translating a podcast into a theatrical performance doesn't always work, but this is a fresh, freewheeling, and funny series that breathes new life into the tired late-night television landscape. Though 2 Dope Queens is being presented as a limited series, Williams and Robinson fulfill their roles as hosts and presenters so effortlessly and naturally that you kind of hope this turns out to be a precursor to more to come. Whether this is your first time hearing the queens or you're a longtime listener of their podcast, their lively chemistry and fun banter with guests is easy to warm up to. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the challenges of turning a podcast into a television show. Did 2 Dope Queens pull it off, in your opinion? Are there other podcasts you'd like to see turned into TV shows?

  • The late-night television landscape has been dominated by male hosts for a long time. How does having two hosts who are female and African American make this show different from most comedy offerings?

TV details

For kids who love comedy

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