Albert & Junior

TV review by
Joyce Slaton, Common Sense Media
Albert & Junior TV Poster Image
Talking smart phone answers gentle preschool puzzlers.

Parents say

age 3+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

Junior guides Albert through any number of topics of interest to and educational for preschoolers: why vegetables are important, how plaque makes cavities in teeth (and thus why you must brush). 

Positive Messages

Junior always helps Albert learn what he wants to know, and stay safe and healthy. Albert thanks him for his help at the end of each episode. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Junior seems mature but non-threatening -- kids will relate to this all-knowing small character. Albert's mother is present, and attentive. 

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Junior is based on the Nabi tablet.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Albert & Junior is an educational show for preschoolers starring a curious three-year-old (Albert) and his friend (Junior), who looks like a smart phone or tablet. The entirety of Albert's adventures take place in his own home, with Junior presenting the animated answers to preschooler-type questions. Adults are present and caring; there's nothing scary. Young kids will be interested to see the lighthearted (but thoroughly educational) answers to questions they wonder about. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byCorymom March 8, 2016

Pre-school animated tv show to prepare your child for school

Albert is a young 3 year old boy who has lots of questions and sounds very grown up to everyone. Albert is a 3 year old boy pre-schooler and junior is some kind... Continue reading
Parent Written byBrandee H. June 1, 2018

Even I’m learning

Albert had a traditional childlike look at things (It’s raining because the sky is crying). Junior explains what’s going on and even answering questions. Dinosa... Continue reading

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What's the story?

ALBERT & JUNIOR follows the gentle adventures of Albert, a quizzical three-year-old, and Junior, a talking smart device. In each five-minute episode, Albert wonders something: Why do we need to brush our teeth, anyway? How do bees make honey? Why do I need to learn to read and write? Junior then takes Albert on a tour of the answer, with bright graphics illustrating difficult concepts like vitamins or how plaque can cause cavities. Sometimes Albert grumbles about having to go to bed, or eat his vegetables. But Junior usually convinces him that going along with what Mom wants him to do is exactly the right plan. 

Is it any good?

Slow-moving, mild, and quite charming, this show manages to introduce a few scientific concepts in a way that preschoolers will understand and relate to. Above all, it understands that three-year-olds want to know why. Why do we have to do things the way we're doing them? Why does this or that matter? The choice of subject matter is savvy and perfect for the age: answering lots of why questions, for example, why it rains, or why planes can fly but humans can't. Junior can be a bit of a scold -- we got it, Junior! Vegetables are important! -- but the animation goes on pleasant flights of fancy: "When two carrots dance the tango," Junior emotes over images of carrots having a passionate dance, "they become a glass of yummy carrot juice!" Cute. Preschoolers will think so too, and there's nothing here to alarm or scare them, making this a solid bet for curious young ones.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what Junior is. A smart phone? A tablet? Why is he alive and talking? 

  • Albert's mother sometimes appears on the show. On many cartoon shows, mothers and fathers are absent or referred to but unseen. Why? 

  • How would this show be different if Albert and Junior were animals? Robots? Two people? 

TV details

For kids who love preschool TV

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