Animalia

TV review by
Larisa Wiseman, Common Sense Media
Animalia TV Poster Image
Cool fantasy-adventure series for grade-schoolers.

Parents say

age 6+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Humans and animals work together to solve crises, and communication is a key theme.

Violence & Scariness

Very mild fantasy violence: Menacing animals threaten the two human characters when they first arrive in Animalia.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this lighthearted, fast-paced series (which is based on the popular book by Graeme Base) has nothing but good intentions. The central characters work together to save a society in peril, and the show subtly emphasizes the importance of communication and language arts -- from reading and writing to speech and computer proficiency.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written bylamom January 31, 2010

Perfect for a 5 1/2 + boy

My son started watching the show at 5 1/2. He loves it. I think it is the fantasy part that he loves. All these animals who talk, have opinions, feelings....... Continue reading
Adult Written byginnya17 April 9, 2008

Fun

I just saw it for the first time today with my nephew. We both liked it alot.

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

Based on the wildly popular children's book by Graeme Base, the CGI-animated series ANIMALIA colorfully brings to life a futuristic fantasy world in which animals talk, wear clothes, and do pretty much everything else humans do. Alex (voiced by Brooke Anderson) and Zoe (Katie Leigh) -- two children who are transported from our present world to Animalia via a magic portal in a library -- arrive in this strange land to find all is not well. The Core, a huge, glowing orb that governs Animalia's stability, is faltering and having potentially harmful effects on Animalia's inhabitants. With help from their new animal friends G'bubu the gorilla (Christopher Hobbs), Iggy the iguana (Robert Mark Klein), and Animalia ruler Livingstone T. Lion (who's reminiscent of The Chronicles of Narnia's Aslan), Alex and Zoe set off on one thrilling adventure after another in a quest to help regulate the Core and restore harmony to Animalia.

Is it any good?

Featuring lively storylines and filled with enough silliness to keep any grade-schooler entertained, Animalia can get a bit loud and frantic at times (from an adult point of view, anyway). That said, it's also designed to appeal to today's smart, sophisticated kids -- the dialogue is unusually witty, and the Animalians' use of ultra-advanced technology and other machinery and everyday objects typically used by humans sets a contemporary tone in a zany fantasy world that children will love exploring. Although this won't be obvious to most kid viewers, the show's central theme is communication, as the Core is what enables Animalia's inhabitants to talk and write like humans; according to the show's producers, each episode strives to emphasize the importance of communication skills such as reading, writing, speech, critical thinking, and computer proficiency.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how the series compares to Base's book. Kids: Have you read Animalia? Did you like it? How is the TV show similar to or different from the book? What other books would you like to see turned into TV shows?

TV details

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