Children of the Whales

TV review by
Mark Dolan, Common Sense Media
Children of the Whales TV Poster Image
Dreamy anime fantasy hobbled by awkward storytelling.

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 12+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Characters try to use mercy and understanding to resolve conflicts, instead of resorting to violence. 

 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Chakuro is sensitive and thoughtful, a devoted friend. 

 

Violence

A frightening group called the Murderous Angels kills many people with spears and swords; death, funerals, and grave sites are important to the story.

 

Sex
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Children of the Whales is an anime series concerning a society of supernatural and human residents living on an isolated island in the middle of a fantastic sea of sand. Slower-paced than many anime shows, Children of the Whales has a melancholic tone and underlying sadness that may be attractive to more sensitive teens. However, it still has a fair amount of violence, frightening images, and death-related subject matter.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byWillow S. August 6, 2018

Has many positive messages and good for mature kids!

There is nothing inappropriate about this show and no curse words. I believe it is TV-MA because of it's violence. It does show blood, but obviously it... Continue reading
Parent of a 5, 11, and 14 year old Written byDamien M. August 22, 2018

A bit gruesome for younger kids

At the start of the third episode a whole bunch of people are killed, including several children.
Teen, 13 years old Written byRoxie P May 15, 2018

I love this show!

I know that not a lot of people have heard of this manga/show , but I urge you to give it a chance. It has a captivating storyline and characters that you can r... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written bySnikuurs July 2, 2018

Great!!!

This show/manga is amazing in and of itself. I agree with the previous review that it has a captivating story line and you can really connect with the character... Continue reading

What's the story?

In CHILDREN OF THE WHALES, young teen Chakuro wonders about the origin of his mystical homeland known as the Mud Whale, an isolated island on the vast Sea of Sand. Home to both supernatural beings known as "the Marked" and humans, the Unmarked, residents of the Mud Whale are mysteriously required to suppress their emotions. When a floating island passes near the Mud Whale, Chakuro and a small team investigate and discover a wounded woman who tries to attack him with swords she controls by telepathy. Her stories of the outside world cause serious repercussions in the strict rules-based society of the Mud Whale.

Is it any good?

This series features an imaginative, dreamlike universe with a number of little details that help it feel lived in and real. Unfortunately, the storytelling is somewhat awkward. Significant events occur with very little preceding context, leaving the viewer with questions that may only get partially answered if addressed at all.

Also, the mythology of the series is quite complicated. Keeping track of all the various factions, powers, and allegiances, many of which have unique, nonintuitive-sounding names can be very difficult. Fans of high fantasy who are used to assimilating this kind of specialized nomenclature will fare well here. Those who have less patience for intricate world-building may find Children of the Whales more frustrating than enjoyable.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about anime. How is it different from American animation? How is it the same? 

  • Why do the residents of the Mud Whale suppress their emotions? Have you encountered other stories where characters are forced to live without emotions? What is it about this idea that's so compelling to storytellers?

  • The characters of Children of the Whales have a unique vocabulary with words like "thymia," "apathiea," and "lykos." Do made-up words like this help immerse you in a story or do they keep you at a distance?

TV details

For kids who love animated adventure

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate