Eli Stone

TV review by
Kari Croop, Common Sense Media
Eli Stone TV Poster Image
Hokey premise makes good message hard to swallow.

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 7 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Although Eli is conflicted about his new mission in life, he moves mountains to help other people. In the beginning, his motivations are purely selfish. But over time, he truly begins to become a more selfless person.

Violence
Sex

Adult characters are occasionally showing "making out," with the implication that they're in the act of having sex. But no sensitive body parts are shown.

Language

Some use of words like "ass" and "damn."

Consumerism

George Michael and his songs "Faith" and "Freedom" are central to the plots of several episodes.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Adults are sometimes shown drinking socially.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that, aside from a few semi-steamy scenes involving adults in the throes of implied passion, there's no reason families can't watch this show together. The overarching message of helping others is a positive one, and the language is surprisingly clean. The main character also proves a worthy role model as he navigates his newfound role of once-sharky lawyer turned do-gooder.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bymmcoropuna April 9, 2008

Fun

I enjoy Eli Stone Every Thursday Night. I also make sure I TiVo it, in case I missed something during a break. But I do suggest It to many people out there.... Continue reading
Adult Written byzzbo50 April 9, 2008

A show with a message.

If more people help out fellow man this world would be a better place.
Kid, 12 years old April 9, 2008

GREAT SHOW A MUST WATCH

I ONLY STARTED TO WATCH IT BECAUSE IT WAS AFTER LOST BUT THEN I REALLY GOT INTO IT AND I LOVE IT!!! ELI IS SO FUNNY THAT YOU CANT PUT IT TO WORDS!!
Kid, 12 years old July 8, 2009

e.g. You should think twice before going with a tween!

i love this show and was so mad when it got canceled

What's the story?

Ladder-climbing corporate lawyer ELI STONE (Jonny Lee Miller) is jolted into a strange new world that nobody else can see when he starts having visions involving pop star George Michael. His neurosurgeon brother (Matt Letsher) blames an inoperable brain aneurysm. But after consulting a Chinese acupuncturist (James Saito), Eli slowly begins to suspect that he might, in fact, be a modern-day prophet. To make the voices in his head stop screaming, Eli must use his legal prowess to solve other people's problems -- in essence, to do God's work.

Is it any good?

Thanks to an original premise, over-the-top special effects, and elaborate song-and-dance sequences (some of which are actually cringe-worthy), Eli Stone is the kind of series with the potential to develop a cult following. But it's also a drama with comic aspirations that fall a bit flat.

It's not that Miller isn't a likeable lead (his mix of charm and bewilderment is perfect) or that the comedy isn't clever (the revelation that Eli's sage acupuncturist, Dr. Chen, is actually a regular guy named Frank Niebowkowski is genius). It's just that, for some, the series as a whole might try a little too hard to be cute. It's also puzzling that Michael's music features prominently -- almost as puzzling as the idea that he could help sell the series in the first place.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about whether a person who claimed to be getting messages from a higher power in real life would be taken seriously or considered seriously disturbed. If you were in Eli's position, would you risk your career to help other people? Is it possible to put other people's interests ahead of your own and still have a successful career, or do you have to choose one path or the other? Do you need to be prompted by visions to help others? What are some simple ways to positively affect the lives of those around you?

TV details

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