Gentefied

TV review by
Jenny Nixon, Common Sense Media
Gentefied TV Poster Image
Funny, family-centric drama examines race, class issues.

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Family is the focus here, and we learn a lot about the varying generations and their bonds with one another. Community and ethnic pride are front and center, with perseverance and integrity being major themes.

Positive Role Models & Representations

These characters are far from perfect -- mistakes are surely made -- but the emphasis on family means that even when someone screws up, they are there for one another and do their best to make amends. Great depictions of multi-layered Latinx men and women, without resorting to cheap stereotypes. Topics such as toxic masculinity and female empowerment are frequently brought up.

Violence
Sex

A few love scenes, but no nudity -- mainly just mild make-outs. A male character's bare behind is briefly shown in a party scene.

Language

Expletives run the gamut from "s--t" and "bitch" to "motherf--ker" and are frequently uttered.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Scenes of adults drinking booze, a few characters smoke pot. Two characters go to a rave and take psychedelic drugs.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Gentified is a dramedy produced by America Ferrera (Ugly Betty, Superstore) that explores cultural identity and gentrification through the struggles and triumphs of a tight-knit Mexican-American family in Los Angeles' Boyle Heights neighborhood. Race, economics, and sexuality are all common topics addressed on the show. There's frequent language including "s--t" and "bitch" to "motherf--ker,"  a few love scenes (no nudity), and there's little-to-no violence to speak of, either. A few scenes with adults drinking in a bar, pot is smoked a couple of times and two characters go to a rave and take psychedelics (a male character's bare bottom is briefly shown). Though the show is mainly in English, many characters slip in and out of speaking Spanish -- but there are subtitles. The political and social commentary should give parents and teens a lot to talk about, and the show can be quite funny to boot.

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User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent Written byRivertown Mom March 3, 2020

Bilingual (Spanish English) family comedy drama! Highly recommend!

I cannot figure out why this series is rated "MA" on Netflix. This is a warm and literate exploration of how an extended family and their friends. l... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byarieltonaldo34 April 11, 2020

gentefied

people that are watching Gentefied age rating up to 13 and up is nothing that bad inappropriate

What's the story?

GENTEFIED is a half-hour series that's part-comedy, part-drama, examining issues of cultural identity and gentrification through the struggles and triumphs of a tight-knit Mexican-American family in Los Angeles' Boyle Heights neighborhood. Much of the action centers on Mama Fina's, the taco shop owned by widowed grandfather Casimiro (Joaquin Cosio, Quantum of Solace) -- aka Pops -- which is hanging by a thread in a time of rising rents and encroaching hipsters. Casimiro lives with his two grandsons, the sometimes hotheaded Erik (a fiercely-protective but flaky dad-to-be) and aspiring chef Chris (who grew up with money, and is often referred to as a "coconut": brown on the outside, white on the inside). Also in their orbit is cousin Ana, a young painter who is trying to figure out how to make it in the overwhelmingly bourgeois art world without betraying her roots -- an issue that's especially important to her outspoken activist girlfriend, Yessika.

Is it any good?

What does it mean to change when your community's being displaced...and is it even worth it? These are the issues faced by the Morales family, and examined with a skillful blend of humor and depth. The series does a terrific job giving its characters distinct and real-feeling personalities, especially considering the episodes are so short. It's also a remarkably refreshing change to see Latinx men depicted not merely as drug lords or gang members but as sensitive, multifaceted human beings -- there are no one-note macho stereotypes at play here. Gentefied excels at interweaving storylines that tackle big-picture cultural questions with the smaller challenges of daily life, and it'd be fairly difficult not to be hooked and begging for a second season by the time you get to the series' cliffhanger ending.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the show's title, Gentified, and what the play on words means. ("Gente" means "people" in Spanish.)

  • Why do some of the characters seem to have an issue with Chris, and the way he grew up? What is the show trying to say about the idea of someone being a "real" Mexican?

  • How do the characters in Gentefied demonstrate perseverance? Why is this an important character strength?

TV details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love diverse characters

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