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Lego City Adventures

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Lego City Adventures TV Poster Image
Toy-inspired cartoon series is fast, flashy, and funny.

Parents say

age 8+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 2+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

Intends to entertain rather than to educate, but it does draw attention to the important work of public servants.

Positive Messages

The show centers on stories in which the city's everyday heroes and public servants get to serve and protect the citizens, so it's a more relatable character pool than in many other Lego productions that focus on more mythical superheroes. The distinction between the good guys and the bad guys is easy to see in the characters' actions and in how they look. Both men and women hold positions of rank among the cast. A subtle theme of the show reminds kids of the valuable work of community helpers like police, firefighters, and maintenance crews.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Even though they work for the common good and put the community's needs before their own, the fact that the characters' personalities are exaggerated for comic effect means that they're not always stellar role models. Freya often makes unrealistic demands of her crew, and she's loud all the time. Duke's arrogance gets him into sticky situations that destroy police department vehicles and supplies, but he generally gets a pass from his dim boss. Some rescuers panic under pressure and cause more harm than good.

Violence & Scariness

Cartoon-style violence includes explosions, vehicle crashes, long falls, and building implosions. Predictably, no one dies, and injuries have a funny feel to them as the Lego characters add bulky casts and bandages to their blocky bodies.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Like most of the franchise's media productions, this series is an effective advertising tool for Lego merchandise. It incorporates unique qualities of the blocky toys in ways that add much to the show's humor and directly relate to the popular building sets.

 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Lego City Adventures is an animated series set in a busy Lego metropolis where community helpers like police, firefighters, and sanitation workers are the stories' heroes. Expect lots of cartoon mishaps -- like combustible liquid explosions, crashes, and extensive damage to buildings from an oversized runaway balloon -- but injuries aren't too common and are typically played for humor. Even though the stories make an effort to cast female characters in powerful positions like fire chief, they're often defined by personality quirks like chronic grumpiness or a bossy demeanor. Still, despite the fact that this series doubles as a pretty effective advertising campaign for the Lego brand/merchandise, it's a genuinely funny show with fast-paced, unpredictable humor.

 

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

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Teen, 15 years old Written byWeasleyIsOurKing07 August 7, 2019

Finally, LEGO shows I can watch with my younger siblings!!!

These are the best! The characters are funny and have their own personalities. Lots of LEGO humor. THANK YOU LEGO!! I'm so happy with these! I can't... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byKevoskee5 August 4, 2019

The best lego show

Lego city is the best lego show I've seen so far

What's the story?

LEGO CITY ADVENTURES is a collection of stories centered on the hardworking and devoted public servants who keep a bustling metropolis running smoothly. Or -- in the case of Lego City -- merely running. When calamity befalls the busy city, it's community helpers like Officer Duke Detain (voiced by Joe Zieja) and Fire Chief Freya McCloud (Misty Lee) who are quick to respond. Their tactics might be a bit (or a lot) unorthodox, but no one can fault them their bravery, and in the end they get the job done and safeguard their home from mishaps, robbers, and the occasional intrepid villain.

Is it any good?

Lego's recipe for hilarious entertainment tailored to the well-known blocky toy line rarely disappoints, and these stories, based on some of the most dysfunctional community safety departments you've ever seen, fall right in line. One-line zingers poke fun at Lego mores (large bags with dollar signs that act as robber bait, for instance) and classic cartoon cliches (villains whose premature celebrations prove their undoing). The wacky characters certainly wouldn't cut it as chiefs and safety professionals in the real world, but they're just right for a city that's as unpredictable as they are.

What makes Lego City Adventures a lot of fun is the rapid-fire humor in both dialogue and situational plot, much of which will be lost on young kids. As silly as the plot and characters can be, the whole package is more tailored to tweens and teens who can follow the somewhat frantic pace and constant action.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the popularity of movies and TV series based on toys. Does seeing the characters onscreen make you more interested in the toys themselves? How does the Lego brand compare to others that have brought their characters to the screen?

  • Are the community helpers in this story good role models? In what ways do they exhibit courage and determination? Do they ever disappoint in their actions? How might their real-life counterparts in their jobs handle similar situations differently than they do?

  • Do the stories in Lego City Adventures have a point or set out to teach viewers anything? Does entertainment have to educate to be worthwhile? Why or why not?

TV details

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