Losing It with Jillian

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Losing It with Jillian TV Poster Image
Family fitness interventions are both positive and gimmicky.

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The show promotes family togetherness, responsibility, and teamwork, and Michaels argues that losing weight is part of an overall strategy to improve your health -- and, as a result, your overall life. That said, some of her motivational techniques feel a bit extreme.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Despite her tough approach, Michaels wants to help people.

Violence

Michaels' motivational techniques include losing her temper, yelling, and threatening her clients in order to get them to work out harder.

Sex
Language

Words like “hell,” “ass,” “pissed,” and “crap” are frequently audible. Occasional curses like “f--king” are bleeped.

Consumerism

Overall, the series functions as a subtle promotional vehicle for Michaels.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking is discussed within the context of its impact on people's overall health.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this series follows families as they work with celebrity fitness trainer Jillian Michaels (of The Biggest Loser) to lose weight and improve their overall health and wellness. It’s pretty mild, but there's some iffy language (mostly “hell,” “damn,” and “ass,” with occasional stronger curses bleeped). Michaels sometimes uses yelling and threats to "inspire" people to exercise harder -- techniques that might not sit well with everyone. In at least one episode, the death of a parent is discussed.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Teen, 14 years old Written byimitatior February 6, 2011

some swearing, but the big thing is positive messages

some swearing now and then, but it has a lot of good messages about commitment, family and being healthy.

What's the story?

In LOSING IT WITH JILLIAN, The Biggest Loser star Jillian Michaels applies her trademark “tough love” training regimens to help families who've put their physical health on the back burner. For one week, the celebrity trainer moves in with an American family that's coping with a physical and/or emotional crisis and helps them get their lives back into shape. In addition to providing a new fitness plan, Michaels assists them with removing the clutter from their homes and helps them find ways to encourage positive family dynamics. The trainer leaves each family she helps with a wellness plan and a list of goals that they can continue to work on together.

Is it any good?

Overall, the series uses exercise and weight loss as metaphors for unloading personal burdens, facing new challenges, and improving your life. It also demonstrates ways that exercise can be fun for the whole family. Responsibility and teamwork are also reinforced.

But while the show's messages are positive, they're delivered within the context of a gimmicky "intervention" that serves as a subtle self-promotional vehicle for Michaels. Despite her good intentions, the trainer sometimes comes across as a little patronizing, too. But if you can get past that, Losing It offers some constructive lessons about how health and fitness can improve your outlook on life.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about health and fitness. How does the media impact the way that your family prioritizes health and fitness? Do you think shows like this one will really inspire people to change their lives? Why or why not? 

  • How could you and your family members improve your overall health? What things does and/or can your family do to stay active and healthy?

  • Parents: Check out our tips and advice about talking to your kids about physical health.

TV details

For kids who love being healthy

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