Moone Boy

Common Sense Media says

Irish comedy has drinking and cursing but sweet family ties.

Age(i)

2
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5
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9
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11
12
13
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17

Quality(i)

 

What parents need to know

Positive messages

Family members deceive one another, but are mostly loving and supportive; cliches about bullies and feminists are subverted smartly. Martin's mother supports a female political candidate and there is a lot of discussion about women's roles and rights.

Positive role models

Martin Moone has a typical adolescent boy's preoccupations (bullies, bicycles, getting along with his family), but he's sweeter than most. His loving parents are present and his big sisters aren't exactly supportive but are there for him in the clinch. His imaginary friend is alternately supportive and insulting.

Violence

Some scuffling, particularly when Martin is set upon by bullies who push him down and slap him. The violence never feels menacing or terrifying.

Sex

Expect flirting, dating, and kissing. In one scene, Martin promises a boy he can feel his sister's breasts in payment for protecting him against bullies. The sister finds out about the plan and is furious but ultimately decides to have a date with the hopeful feeler.

Language

Many four-letter words mostly used mildly: "Straighten this s--t out." Many characters also use the word "feck," as if it's "f--k." Some characters use the word "gay" as a slur.

Consumerism
Not applicable
Drinking, drugs, & smoking

Characters drink and smoke onscreen; nobody acts drunk.

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that Moone Boy is a family comedy imported from Ireland about a sweet 12-year-old boy trying to make his way in the world. Four-letter words are frequently heard, generally in a mild context, and there are sexual jokes and references. A pair of bullies push main character Martin Moone around and there are scuffles and slaps. Characters drink and smoke onscreen, but nobody acts drunk. Martin's loving if imperfect parents are present and caring, however, they admit they hate their kids at times, which may require explanations if children watch. Martin's three sisters are all teens who date and flirt; a scene in which Martin promises a friend he can feel his sister's breasts is played for laughs. Martin himself has an invisible adult best friend who often mocks him and calls him things like "idiot boy," yet acts mostly supportively.

Parents say

Not yet rated
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Kids say

What's the story?

Martin Paul Kenny Daglish Moone, the MOONE BOY of this half-hour comedy's title, is a 12-year-old boy growing up in Ireland in the 1980s with his distractible dad, his feminist mum, and three sarcastic big sisters, who barely let Martin get a word in edgewise. Martin himself is dreamy and sweet, given to antics like trying to revive a dead bird with CPR, which does nothing to bring back the bird but invites the attention of the school bullies, the Bonner brothers. Oh, and he has an imaginary adult best friend, Sean (Chris O'Dowd, show creator), who alternately eggs him on and insults him. But plucky Martin keeps on keeping on, taking solace in the animated figures he creates to keep his company, and in his family, imperfect as they are.

Is it any good?

QUALITY
 

Feck yeah! Feck? That's the Moone Boy stand-in for "f--k," apparently, repeated ad nauseam by characters who wonder "What the feck are you on about?" or "What the feck do we have here?" when Martin is discovered yet again doing something goofy like practicing kissing on his hand, or befriending a new boy just to be invited to eat the gourmet meals his parents prepare. Moone Boy boast the same DNA as a fine wacky American family comedy like Malcolm in the Middle, but its enchanting foreignness (Americans won't even get many of the jokes, much less be able to understand all the dialogue) gives it a unique and special spin.

Also special: Show creator O'Dowd, who based Martin and his foibles on his own life, apparently likes and respects women, who are given a lot to do here. His mom and sisters aren't just background or preparers of tea; they're political animals who support "girl power" and give Martin hell whenever he does something stupid. They're as vital and complex as the male characters; rare in comedy, especially in sitcoms with a male main character. They look a lot more like the real families of the tweens and teens who should enjoy watching Moone Boy right along with their parents, because this show has a realistic character for everyone in the family to relate to.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about whether Martin Moone's family is loving or not. The family often mocks one another. Is it done kindly or unkindly? How can you tell?

  • Moone Boy is set in Ireland. How can you tell this is not an American show? Are the accents different? The themes explored? The setting? The moral codes of its characters?

  • Moone Boy is written and created by Chris O'Dowd, who plays imaginary friend Sean. Given that the show is set in the 1980s, right about the time O'Dowd would have been an adolescent, do you think the show is autobiographical? Why or why not?

TV details

Cast:Chris O'Dowd, David Rawle
Network:Hulu
Genre:Comedy
Topics:Brothers and sisters
TV rating:NR
Available on:Streaming

This review of Moone Boy was written by

About our rating system

  • ON: Content is age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • PAUSE: Know your child; some content may not be right for some kids.
  • OFF: Not age-appropriate for kids this age.
  • NOT FOR KIDS: Not appropriate for kids of any age.

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Quality

Our star rating assesses the media's overall quality.

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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Teen, 13 years old Written byFamilyTrek January 3, 2014
AGE
11
QUALITY
 

Funny!

There is only one use of strong language in the first series. There also moderate sex references like a child getting a erection from watching cartoon pornography and a man asking a teenage girl to have sex with him in his car, later on it turns out she's pregnant. The B-word is also used a lot. Probably about three times in every episode.
What other families should know
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Kid, 12 years old October 16, 2013
AGE
12
QUALITY
 

Uncomfortable Scenes

I really love watching the show however some certain episodes contain scenes of which I myself felt a little bit uncomfortable with. Other than that, a pretty harmless Irish comedy series.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models
Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking

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