Parents' Guide to

Quarterlife

By Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media Reviewer

age 15+

Angsty drama series is mature but has substance.

TV Bravo , Online Drama 2008
Quarterlife Poster Image

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What you will—and won't—find in this TV show.

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Each episode (9 minutes online; longer in the repurposed TV version) combines humor and drama as the members of the bright-but-rather-self-absorbed group deal with friendships, endure the angst of romance, and struggle to hold on to their creativity while balancing the expectations of the professional world. But as Dylan's blog becomes more popular, these private events become very public, often leading to some very embarrassing and compromising moments. As a result, Dylan finds herself risking both her relationships and her career while she tries to satisfy her own artistic spirit.

Quarterlife was initially conceived as a TV series by Emmy Award winners Ed Zwick and Marshall Herskovitz (best known for the popular series thirtysomething and My So-Called Life). The fact that it continues their tradition of good writing, solid characters, and multiple plotlines may be why network execs decided to broadcast it after all, once it found success online. But while the show has some substance, it's also got the kind of content generally associated with corporate-sponsored online shows -- most notably, prominent placement of brand-name products (in this case, Toyota Yaris hybrid vehicles). There's also plenty of sexual innuendo (including references to various sexual acts and audible orgasm sounds) and some strong language (including words like "crap" and "bitch"). So while the show is entertaining, it's not your best bet for tweens or and younger teens.

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