Say Yes to the Dress: Big Bliss

TV review by
Anne Louise Bannon, Common Sense Media
Say Yes to the Dress: Big Bliss TV Poster Image
Plus-sized spin-off with more compassion than original.

Parents say

age 12+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The overriding message is that larger women also deserve to feel beautiful and to have dresses that flatter them. But the show also plays into the Queen for a Day/Bridezilla idea, emphasizing conflict and bratty behavior, plus an attitude toward high-priced gowns that not all viewers will relate to.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The sales people are the heroes here. They work very hard to help their brides (and complete sales) and are very service-oriented. They are also very compassionate toward the women's concerns about their size. The women are a mixed bag -- some bratty, some sweet.

Violence
Sex

Being sexy is touted as a virtue.

Language

At least one customer is prone to bleeped language, and the words "ass" and "boobs" are heard, but most of the language is pretty tame.

Consumerism

No obvious commercial tactics, but the Kleinfeld bridal store and its staff get buckets of publicity and PR from the show.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this spin-off of the popular Say Yes to the Dress series contains much of the same bratty behavior and focus on familial conflict as the original, but with a touch more compassion toward the brides, who are all plus-sized women. Expect occasional language ("ass" and "boobs"), plus some bleeped words.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 2, 4, and 5 year old Written bynmaab January 11, 2011

real

I have seen this show and it is good not the best thing in the world but it does get girls think cause the people in the store do explain scens and they do see... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old March 27, 2012

Neat show

I really like this show. It's so cool and fun to see all the beautiful dresses that they have!

What's the story?

A reality of life for plus-sized women is that when they need or want a special dress, their options are limited. And for larger brides, that problem is particularly acute. Enter Kleinfeld's Bridal Salon, the salon featured in the original Say Yes to the Dress, which is one of the few that also carries large-sized sample dresses. The format of the show is the same as the original -- the bride comes into the shop; she introduces her family and/or companions; she talks about her fiance and why she loves him -- then she tries on dresses!

Is it any good?

While it is nice seeing the compassionate attitude of the staff toward the larger women, the show is essentially the same as the original -- including the edited-for-maximum-drama family conflicts. It is fairly easy to get caught up in the emotions of the moment, but it's also a little repetitive. Still, for those in the throes of wedding planning, or wedding fantasy -- especially those without a model-size body -- it's nice to see that one doesn't have to be a size 2 to get a lovely wedding dress.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about whether this show reinforces the stigma of being fat.  Parents can ask their children if they think the show makes fun of heavy women and why it does or doesn't.

  • How real is the show? Do you think the women are really as nice or as mean as they're portrayed, or is the show set up to make them look that way?

  • Does the show contribute to unrealistic expectations for what a good wedding is? Talk about how much money the dresses cost and why people might choose to spend or not to spend that kind of money on a dress.

TV details

  • Premiere date: October 1, 2010
  • Network: TLC
  • Genre: Reality TV
  • TV rating: TV-G

For kids who love dressing up

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