SWAT Kats: The Radical Squadron

TV review by
KJ Dell Antonia, Common Sense Media
SWAT Kats: The Radical Squadron TV Poster Image
Kid-friendly action 'toon has cat cops, cool jets.

Parents say

age 11+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

While violent and careless, the heroes are proud to defend their city and have strong relationships with each other and other characters. Female characters are less stereotyped than in many action cartoons.

Violence & Scariness

Plenty of action cartoon violence, with laser weapons, fighter jets, attack helicopters, and everything a SWAT team could need to defend a besieged city. Both villains and heroes are rather careless of the lives of extras, although their deaths are never explicitly shown.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this is an action cartoon with lots of violence, explosions, and high-tech weaponry -- so it's not for really young kids. That said, it has a number of strengths. The characters are relatively well developed, with relationships and backstories. And even though the female characters aren't the heroes themselves, they hold powerful roles in the city and aren't portrayed with the typical wasp waists and big breasts that populate many action cartoons.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bydanny 7000 August 29, 2017

swat kats is not for kids

i think swat kats is a very good show but its not for kids because its very vilonte a giant bacteria monster absorbs a bunch of characters and some characters d... Continue reading
Adult Written byLowe's man April 26, 2018

Not memorable, but with some redeeming qualities.

Because of the type and level of violence, I would say that 8 is a better age for this show. Moreover, my memory may be fuzzy, as I only saw this a couple time... Continue reading
Teen, 17 years old Written by11SecondsAtMach5 March 19, 2014

SWAT Kats: a stylistic, action-heavy cartoon with a lot of heart. And missiles. Lots of missiles.

SWAT Kats is one of my favourite cartoons from the 90s. Believe it or not, this was the No.1 syndicated cartoon in 1994, but it was cancelled shortly after. :(... Continue reading
Kid, 12 years old April 27, 2011

Awesome

I love this show, its on rerun where i live, and its so awesome! theres tons of action in it, might be to much for young kids but anyone 10+ would probly love t... Continue reading

What's the story?

SWAT KATS, which originally ran on TBS for two years in the early 1990s, is the ongoing saga of two heroic felines in a city populated entirely by cats. Former officers in a glamorous high-tech police squad known as The Enforcers, Chance "T-Bone" Furlong (voiced by Charles Adler) and Jake "Razor" Clawson (Barry Gordon) are now reduced to city salvage workers who must protect their city undercover (a task that requires jet fighting, laser guns, and the ability to deal with everything from alien cicadas to alternate universes). Working in cooperation with the police and the mayor, they keep their true identities secret and are invariably good -- if rogue -- citizens.

Is it any good?

For an action cartoon, SWAT Kats has several things going for it. Female characters are strong and fearless. And the heroes, even while operating undercover, cooperate with the police, who aren't portrayed as either corrupt or foolish. Instead, although they're good, the official police just aren't as willing or able as the SWAT Kats to do whatever it takes to get the job done. The buddy relationship between the two main characters is also nice -- they may be undercover crime fighters, but they're never alone. Both guys seem to feel like they have friends in the city, and they seem pretty happy with what they're doing.

Compared to the many angst-ridden cartoon takes on Spider-Man and Batman, SWAT Kats is both a lighthearted relief and a good option for young viewers who aren't quite ready to consider the moral and ethical implications of superhero status.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the role of the media within the show. One main character is a reporter who often finds trouble but is invariably brave (and reckless) in going after the story. Is that what you think journalists are like in real life? What's good about how she does her job, and what's not? Families can also discuss how this show is similar to and different from other action cartoons.

TV details

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