Texas Multi Mamas

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Texas Multi Mamas TV Poster Image
Milder than Housewives, but still catty.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series highlights the challenges of being the mother multiples. References are made to southern conservative values, and how they can cause tension in relationships. The show's tagline refers to "mama drama," which is definitely highlighted.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The mamas love their children and are dedicated parents, but don't always get along with other people and occasionally make rude or catty comments about other moms or family members.

Violence

Some mild arguments and interpersonal drama. Guns, rifles, and target shooting are occasionally visible.

Sex

Dating, sex lives, and other adult themes are discussed. Kissing is sometimes visible. Contains humorous references to "dirty" texts. One housewife is shown in her underwear at the doctor's office.

Language

Words "bitch" are audible; words like "f--k" are bleeped.

Consumerism

Local Dallas-area haunts like Zephyrs bar are visible.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Alcohol consumption is visible at restaurants and clubs.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this reality series featuring members of a "moms of multiples" group contains some strong language ("bitch," stronger words bleeped), mild conversations about divorce, dating, and sex, and lots of arguing between women. Social drinking is also visible.

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What's the story?

TEXAS MULTI MAMAS is a reality series about six Dallas-area mothers who are raising young multiples, and their relationships with each other. The cast, who met through a "moms of multiples" support group, includes Candace Hickey, a forty-something hipster and mother of triplets, Casey Gerwer and part-time nurse Suz Steece, who are both mothers of quads, Southern belle Teryn Todd, who has a daughter and a triplet of boys, and Tonia Tomlin, an entrepreneur and divorced mother of twin girls. The youngest of the gang is the straightforward Stephanie Williams, who is the mother of a son and twin girls. While balancing a household of children, jobs, husbands, and in some cases, dating, the women turn to each other for support when things get tough. But personalities sometimes clash, which leads to some drama between them.

Is it any good?

The show highlights some of the joys and challenges that come with having multiples, as well as the importance of having a strong support network to help moms cope when things get overwhelming. But its real focus is on the relationship between the six women, which often leads to gossipy moments and catty behavior, some of which seem to be a bit orchestrated in order to add some drama to the show.

It's milder than shows like The Real Housewives, but saucy enough to make it an iffy choice for younger viewers. Meanwhile, unless you find watching moms raising multiples particularly interesting, the overall series might leave you wondering why these women have a reality show in the first place.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what it's like to live in a household of multiples. What are the benefits that come with having a number of siblings the same age. Challenges? Why are some families with multiples featured on reality shows? What makes them so interesting?

  • Why do you think the families on this show agreed to participate? What do they stand to gain or lose? Do you think they exaggerate their behavior to be more entertaining?

TV details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love reality television

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