The Bachelor Winter Games

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
The Bachelor Winter Games TV Poster Image
International reality spin-off mixes winter, romance games.

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 1 review

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Finding love can potentially happen on a reality show, but it often doesn’t work out. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

The cast members are on the show because they are popular, notorious, or both. 

Violence

Folks tumble, fall, and sustain minor injuries during events. There’s some arguments and disagreements. 

Sex

Lots of sexual innuendo; bare male chests and skimpy bikinis are frequently visible. Endless conversations about virginity, past relationships, and related themes. 

Language

“Damn,” “bitch”; curses are bleeped and blurred. 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking (champagne, beer, cocktails) is frequent. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Bachelor Winter Games is a reality competition show with all the flirting and romantic drama The Bachelor reality franchise is known for. It features lots of skimpy bikinis and bare chests, arguments, and strong sexual innuendo. There’s some strong language like “bitch,” but curses are bleeped and blurred. There’s drinking (wine, champagne, hard liquor), too. 

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What's the story?

THE BACHELOR WINTER GAMES brings together contestants from the international franchise for an Olympic-themed sports competition. Hosted by Chris Harrison and sports broadcaster Hannah Storm, 26 of the most notable cast members from the international versions of The Bachelor and The Bachelorette compete in a series of winter-themed events in Manchester, Vermont. The winners of each of the gender-segregated events win date cards allowing them to ask another cast member out. Rose ceremonies are held, too, and some contestants are sent home early. The final two standing are named the winners. Throughout it all, old flames are ignited, new sparks fly, and romantic connections are made and broken. 

Is it any good?

This nonsensical series follows a now-familiar reality format that highlights on flirting, hook ups, and relationship drama. Cast members, who come from North America, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, have little experience playing the winter sports they are competing in. As a result, they are more excited about potentially falling in love than being crowned overall game winners.

A few of the contestants reveal some details about the versions of the The Bachelor they originally appeared in, some of which limit the amount of kissing between couples. However, The Bachelor Winter Games follows the U.S. format, which makes this kind of behavior a focal point, and leads to some interesting moments. If you’re a fan of the franchise, you’ll probably find it entertaining. If not, you probably won’t. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the reasons people continue to appear on The Bachelor and The Bachelorette, despite their continued failure to find successful relationships as a result. Is it for attention or notoriety? Or do they really believe that they will ultimately find love on shows like The Bachelor Winter Games?

  • The Bachelor Winter Games features people from around the world who come from different cultures. Are their cultural differences an important part of the show? 

  • Why is sex such a key part of the U.S. versions of the The Bachelor franchise? Why isn't it the same in some international versions of the series?

TV details

For kids who love romance

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