What's New, Scooby-Doo?

TV review by
Sarah Wenk, Common Sense Media
What's New, Scooby-Doo? TV Poster Image
Popular with kids
Silly mysteries with harmless mayhem.

Parents say

age 6+
Based on 9 reviews

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 16 reviews

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The show's main characters are all white, with the exception of Scooby, a canine. Although the girls on the show exhibit "typical" girl behavior, they are also crucial to solving the mysteries, more so than the boys.

Violence & Scariness

There are some very cartoony fights and chases.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that while there aren't many life lessons to be learned from an episode of this show, kids will enjoy the antics of the Scooby gang as they stumble upon and solve mysteries. Only very young children might find the show's puzzles and monsters frightening.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byLowe's man January 17, 2017

The best of the old with the best of the new.

This incarnation has all the elements that made Scooby Doo good, wholesome and popular in the first place- with the mysteries continuing to be exciting- but in... Continue reading
Adult Written bytvconnoisseur May 29, 2015

The Best Incarnation

Although this show doesn’t have the impeccable animation style of the first 4 direct-to-video movies (Zombie Island, Witch’s Ghost, Alien Invaders, and Cyber Ch... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byRachel Hurtz February 27, 2021

It’s pretty good

It is pretty close to the original:Scooby doo where are you.
(1) The monsters are not real. In the first season. But throughout the series there is a bunch of... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byLlamadamadingdong December 29, 2020

Iffy

There was... I'm pretty sure, one episode with loads of swears. Like, next time, so bleep it out. Or, skip the swearing!

What's the story?

In WHAT'S NEW, SCOOBY-DOO?, the Scooby gang travels the world encountering strange creatures with mild evil on their minds. Each week they manage to solve the mystery, with the help of the ever-hungry and ever-frightened Great Dane, Scooby-Doo (Frank Welker). Most of the actual sleuthing comes from Velma (Mindy Cohn), the sensible girl with glasses, and Daphne (Grey DeLisle), the pretty and smart girl. Freddy and Shaggy (Casey Kasem), the boys in the gang, are much less helpful at the mystery business than their female counterparts, though they do provide substantial comic relief.

Is it any good?

Scooby-Doo is silly and harmless. The most risqué moment in one episode set in Paris, for example, was a "wee wee" ("oui, oui") joke. (One nice touch in this episode was the use of French pop songs in the action sequences.) Although there are some scary situations -- a model is kidnapped by a gargoyle, a wrestler is challenged by a monster -- they're quickly resolved, and the scariness quotient is low. Some episodes have cliffhanger endings, which are quickly resolved at the start of the next week's episode.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about fears, friendship, and risk-taking, as well as male/female roles and abilities.

TV details

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Themes & Topics

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