Violence consumes these teen superhero stories.

What parents need to know

Educational value

This series intends to entertain rather than to educate.

Positive messages

Violence is the only means to an end in the struggles between good and evil. On the positive side, the teens always manage to get the best of the mad scientist villain and his host of minion monsters, relying on teamwork and playing to each other’s strengths. 

Positive role models

Responsible adults are mostly absent throughout the show, although Jason does get some helpful guidance from a man about listening to his inner self to better tap into his powers. The heroes themselves are civic-minded and put themselves in danger to protect the city’s residents.

Violence & scariness

Violence is rampant throughout each episode, with characters (both villains and heroes) using everything from fire to energy rays to laser blasts to take down their enemies. There’s a fair amount of talk about killing, and sometimes innocent bystanders are used as bait in the villains’ plans to undo the heroes. Only monsters meet their demise; the teen superheroes and innocent bystanders always manage to escape the firestorms unscathed.

Sexy stuff

Lots of flirting/flirty talk among teen characters (including frequent use of words like "hot" and "hottie").


No cursing, but language like “stupid” and “butt” is common. 


The characters in the show originated in commercials for Skechers, and the shoe company is a co-producer of the series, though viewers unfamiliar with the commercials won't notice any advertising.

Drinking, drugs, & smoking
Not applicable

Parents Need to Know

Parents need to know that the characters in this action cartoon originated within a Skechers commercial and the show could be construed as an extended advertisement for Skechers, who is a producer of the program. In addition, the show is fraught with physical and weapon-related violence. Teen superheroes face off with a mad scientist villain who creates powerful monsters to do his bidding, so their lives are expendable, and their deaths -- although implied rather than actually shown -- are commonplace. What’s more, the show’s glaring lack of positive adult influences on the teens makes for a pretty unrealistic scenario, so it’s important that if your kids tune in, they realize the differences between fantasy and reality.

What's the story?

In ZEVO-3, three teens’ lives are changed forever when they’re exposed to a mysterious substance called Zevo Compound and develop superhuman abilities. Suddenly Jason, Ellie, and Matt are thrust into an ongoing battle with Stankfoot, the mad scientist villain who created the compound, and his host of mutant monsters. It will take all of their powers combined to put an end to the evil he inflicts and to protect the residents of New Eden City.

Is it any good?


It’s tempting to hope that a story about three teens putting themselves in harm’s way to take down a malicious force would have some good themes for kids watching, but in this case, positive content is pretty hard to come by. Jason, Ellie, and Matt do learn to rely on each other and use their individual strengths to get the better of the more powerful monsters, but that’s the extent of anything positive.

Instead, the show is brimming with violence of nearly every kind, and in each instance the heroes manage to escape the barrage of fire, laser blasts, blunt force trauma, and chemical warfare from Stankfoot and his monsters without a scratch. Meanwhile, many of the monsters meet their demise at the teens’ hands, though their deaths are usually implied rather than shown. In other words, it’s clear that reality wasn’t a goal for the creators of this show, nor apparently was treating an impressionable audience to more worthwhile content they can grow on.

Families can talk about...

  • Families can talk about how violence is portrayed by the media. Did you think this show was overly violent for a cartoon? How does it compare to other ones you’ve seen? What, if anything, about the show’s style made the violence seem less realistic? Does seeing fighting on TV make it seem less harmful in real life to you?

  • Kids: How do you define a hero? What qualities do you admire in a role model? Who are some of your heroes? How does having a role model to look up to help you make good choices?

  • What are some of your special skills? How have you practiced and honed these skills? What kinds of things can you do with them? Can you use them to help people? To help your community? How do teams employ many people’s individual skills for the good of the whole?

  • Talk about the relationship betweens kids TV and consumer products. Does watching a show make kids more likely to buy a toy or other merchandise associated with that show? What about this show -- do you think it's an extended commercial for Skechers?

TV details

Cast:Bryton James, Dante Basco, Kari Wahlgren
Genre:Kids' Animation
Topics:Superheroes, Adventures
TV rating:TV-Y7-FV

This review of Zevo-3 was written by

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Learning ratings

  • Best: Really engaging; great learning approach.
  • Very Good: Engaging; good learning approach.
  • Good: Pretty engaging; good learning approach.
  • Fair: Somewhat engaging; OK learning approach.
  • Not for Learning: Not recommended for learning.
  • Not for Kids: Not age-appropriate for kids; not recommended for learning.

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What parents and kids say

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Teen, 17 years old Written byTheMolli6 October 15, 2010

Just when I thought cartoons couldn't get any worse....

I turn on my T.V, only to find "Zevo-3" This show is just terrible! I'm disgusted with what Nick is actually airing. Are you serious? It's a 22 minute commercial. Not only that, but it's blatantly obvious that Sketchers made this to sell their products. Also, the plot-line, character development, and character designs are really dense, and don't even get me started on the dated slang, or the fact that the characters possess incredibly lame powers. Please do not even let your children watch this. When you see this show, change the channel. You'll be glad you did.
What other families should know
Too much consumerism
Parent Written bymnv August 11, 2011

terrible show

just an obvious excuse for sketchers to hock shoes
What other families should know
Too much violence
Too much consumerism
Teen, 15 years old Written byibarncat November 28, 2010

Violence does not consume these teen superhero stories

If you saw my first review, know now that I wrote it having seen only about five minutes at most of a small number of episodes early in the show's run. However, I eventually gave the show a full chance, and I was surprised by the fact that it is NOT primitive, and ironically has more continuity than the Voltron Force and Monsuno of modern-day Nicktoons. It is a well-written show that is kind of like X-Men, except it is more realistic in terms of knowing what mutation would actually do to someone. The main characters and the villains are the only ones whose mutations are actually benefitial. The other mutants are physically handicapped and/or extremely ugly. As a result of this, they are hated by society a lot more than the X-Men could ever think possible. In other words, the world of the Zevo-3 is as bad as Magneto makes out his situation to be. The most interesting part about the show is the hypocrisy of the mayor: he is secretly a mutant, yet he is putting all of his energy into destroying the mutants. SPOILER ALERT curiosly enough, he actually succeeds in doing this at the end of the series. All of the mutants are killed except for him and the Zevo-3, who are apparently forced into hiding their powers for good. In other words, this show has the most interesting series finale of any Nick show. Even Dragon Ball Z's series finale wasn't quite that good. And the finales of Danny Phantom and Avatar are dry and overly-predictable in comparison.
What other families should know
Great messages
Great role models


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