Born This Way Foundation

Website review by
Erin Brereton, Common Sense Media
Born This Way Foundation Website Poster Image
Informative, action-driven, positive site light on content.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this website.

Positive Messages

One of the foundation's goals is to provide young people with more positive surroundings, so not surprisingly, site is chock-full of upbeat subject matter, ranging from stories about city leaders' efforts to inspire altruism to suggestions on how to rally friends to do something kind.

Violence
Sex
Language
Consumerism

Donation button appears throughout site, but kids won't see oppressive requests for cash.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

 

 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the Born This Way Foundation site offers optimistic information that can help kids feel and treat each other better. Kids are encouraged to take steps on their own to try to spread kindness, make school and other environments more positive, and access resources to get help if they're suffering from emotional issues. The comments users post are overwhelmingly supportive -- kids won't be exposed to negative banter -- and there's no inappropriate content. Some parents may not want kids posting comments, since they need to do it through Facebook and would, in the process, share their identity with other people who check the foundation's site or Facebook page; but posting really isn't a frequent activity on the site, so kids shouldn't feel a strong pressure to voice their thoughts on posts.

 

User Reviews

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's it about?

The website for the BORN THIS WAY FOUNDATION, launched in 2012 by Lady Gaga and her mother to support young people's wellness, encourages kindness, a positive school climate, and mental wellness. It also includes content from partnerships with companies like Facebook. A youth advisory board advises the foundation on issues; an advisory board composed of youth wellness and mental health, social, and bullying experts guides research projects that are featured on the site. A blog also offers updates on the foundation.

Is it any good?

This website has more content than many philanthropic organizations' sites; it's clearly striving to make its online presence more than just a calling card. The site's sections are well-written -- they touch on relevant topics like cyberbullying and, instead of just providing background, make an extra effort to provide concrete tips so that kids can do something about the issues they're reading about, instead of just feeling frustrated and helpless. Students, for example, can read about online harassment and sign up to become a campus ambassador, or download a playbook with ideas on how to host a party where guests participate in acts of kindness, such as sending a message to a veteran or collecting cans for a local food pantry. The foundation's research arm lends additional legitimacy; its site has also spawned a separate online effort, Channel Kindness, featuring acts of kindness from around the U.S. that are submitted by a team of reporters age 16 to 24.

The Born This Way Foundation site doesn't offer a lot of bells and whistles in terms of games or other interactive features, but because action items kids can utilize in real life are included, that shouldn't be a deal-breaker. The foundation definitely deserves kudos for the content it has produced. Unfortunately, though, there isn't all that much of it. Most sections have just a few items. They're informative, but without more to read, kids aren't likely to return to the site very often. Hopefully, in time, site administrators will add more -- although its unclear when many of the items were posted, but based on their substance, it seems the foundation's efforts are off to a good start.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about volunteering and getting involved in the community. What are some ways your family can contribute?

  • Discuss ways to be compassionate. Can your child identify a recent time when someone was kind? How did that make your child feel?

Website details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love positivity

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate