Parents' Guide to

Spring.me

By Leslie Crenna, Common Sense Media Reviewer

age 17+

Anonymous Q&A's can veer into too-mature territory for kids.

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What you will—and won't—find in this website.

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"Springers" find fun, connections, and a place to express themselves be it wit, music videos, viral memes, cynicism, praise, frustrations, drug use, hooks ups, or sexuality. The Spring.me blog explains how to apply to be a special status ambassador working through a 10-flag hierarchy earning perks and rising to the level of King or Queen of Springdom -- all of which seems like a good way to get users to welcome newbies, stay positive, fill in a complete profile, and login regularly.

Is it safe for kids? It depends. Most users appear to be in their twenties but there's a good number of younger subscribers as well. Question askers and responders do not self-censor with the idea that minors are privy to their candid tone; however, the ability to report and block users and content seems very accessible. Still, there's no guarantee that kids won't see or read some pretty explicit stuff, and as with most anonymous apps and sites, the potential for bullying and inappropriate content is rife.

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